Yet another story in the news about a church that botched report of sexual abuse on its premises. We are hearing about more and more, and there are still more besides, as the problem is certainly more prevalent than just what we see reported. Quite often in retrospect these cases reveal not simply mistakes made but systemic dysfunctions in a church community and a church’s discipleship culture. Below is a list of safeguards: some are obvious bare minimums, others are harder to implement and run deeper than superficial processes and procedures, but all are ways to help establish a church community as a safe place.

1. All employees and all childcare and youth volunteers, or anyone else who has regular contact with children in the church or as a representative of the church, ought to undergo a criminal background check as thoroughly as possible. It will also help if volunteers in these areas are required to be members of the church, assuming membership in a church entails clear communication about covenant responsibilities and church discipline.

2. A church should have a membership structure and a church should exercise church discipline.

3. Churches ought to have a “safe sanctuary” policy in place. Get consultation with an outside firm if necessary, but have a thorough, thoughtful plan in place that “intentionalizes” safety for children and others at risk. This plan should also include processes and procedures if a known sex offender or abuser wants to attend the church.

4. Every officer in the church should have real accountability. To elders, to the congregation, to real people with real authority in the church body, and to a network or denominational board outside the local body if the church is part of one. And this must be real accountability, real authority, not figureheads or “yes men.” They should be a part of a community group. Church officers, including pastors, must be able to be dismissed, and it must not be inordinately difficult to do so.

5. It must be taught to pastors and counselors that confidentiality is a matter of discernment. Pastors are not priests or lawyers or doctors. They are not bound to confidentiality, nor should they be if someone is in danger. In matters of abuse, it must be taught that confidentiality should be employed only if it genuinely protects a victim, not simply because it will protect a church’s reputation or alternately out of some spiritualized fear of hurting an abuser.

6. On that note, we must educate our church what grace is, what repentance is, what forgiveness is, and what reconciliation is. What do they look like? We must understand that the gospel is often a severe mercy to abusers, even genuinely repentant ones, and so it means consequences — disciplinary in the church, legal outside — and accountability. Too often “grace” for the abuser adds more abuse to his or her victim. But justice can be grace. It is amazing how often churches fail in this regard, pushing for relationships between victims and their abusers, spiritualizing some kind of reconnection as if it honors God when really it is a cheapening of grace and often just a way to sweep events under the church rug. In the kingdom of God, the helpless, the hurting, the trampled on, the abused take precedence. Any truly repentant abuser would agree to that. We must remember that a victim’s safety and healing is vastly more important than a church’s convenience.

7. A church must be honest about what it can and can’t do. Too many churches assume help found outside the church body is by definition “worldly” or that all problems must be handled totally in-house. This is foolishness. A wise church will make use of legal authorities if necessary, qualified and trained biblical counseling services, consultants, etc.

8. The discipleship culture of a church needs transparency and the welcome of grace. It must be a safe place to not be okay. This must be initiated and modeled by those in leadership. If a leader is insular and secretive and un-confessional, if he is not a gracious person or a listening person in the church, he sets a standard for a climate of distrust, secrecy, and fear.

9. A church should make humility a top requirement for leaders. Humility is observable. Look for it. And if it is hard to see in a leader, they should probably not be a leader. Everyone struggles with pride, of course, but leaders with surfacing problems of arrogance or aggression or self-centeredness will always struggle in discerning areas of power and vulnerability, which are very important to sort out in preventing abuse or handling its occurrences. You can’t trust an un-humble person to sort through the fallout of abuse occurring under his watch.

10. The preacher should preach against abuse. I’m not saying it ought to be the theme of his ministry, of course, but every Sunday families come into the church service harboring secret sins involving exploitation of the weak and defenseless. Preachers need to bring the fear of God to abusers who may never otherwise be confronted with it. Victims need to know their preacher knows what’s happening to them is serious sin, even if he doesn’t know it’s happening to them. The subject needs to be put out on the table and people need to know where God, and thus the church, stands on abuse.

There is lots more to be said and studied, but those are some hard thoughts for the moment.

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Comments:


49 thoughts on “Safeguarding Against Abuse In the Church”

  1. Jason says:

    Jared,
    Thank you for writing this post. I agree this is something that churches need to be proactive and intentional about, rather than reactive.

  2. KN says:

    Thank you so much for this. Point six especially should be read and carefully considered by all in church leadership.

  3. Trace says:

    Dear Jared,

    Thank you for this article. So many great points!

  4. Big Ben says:

    The points mentioned are way overdue. why not start with insisting and recognising that pastors/ leaders who have strayed morally not be allowed to be in the ministry ever again, at least not in the same capacity as they did previously. and not within 5 years, as if God’s Kingdom had to be propped up by the talents and leadership of these. Many point to King David and talked about how he continued to be king after he was restored. But we forget the David was also refused the privilege to build the temple. Most importantly, He was a King, not a priest or Levite. The fate that awaited Samuel’s and Aaron’s sons were far more severe were they not?

  5. J says:

    I am thankful for this article that will again raise awareness of this issue. One thought is, what is the churches role when the abuse is among older children to younger children. Especially if the older child is a “member”. . .these situations get very difficult.

  6. Anonymous says:

    What about staying connected to the police force? Or knowing the hotlines to call in case of abuse?

  7. Grace says:

    Thank you for this article.

    “This plan should also include processes and procedures if a known sex offender or abuser wants to attend the church.” — I’m wondering if you, or perhaps anyone else reading this, could recommend any good, pragmatic resources or articles that have been written about this element in particular.

    1. John says:

      Baylor College has en entire department dedicated to this. This is a study that PHD social workers wrote at Baylor. Bring in professional like this. You can goofle their website. Not lawyers to CYA but people that work with sexual abuse victims. This is a fascinating paper on clergy abuse and how it happens.

      http://www.baylor.edu/content/services/document.php/96038.pdf

  8. Scott says:

    Thanks Jared, one note as to #5- check with your states laws. In PA clergy are MANDATORY reporters and face prosecution if abuse/potential abuse is not reported.

  9. Julie Anne says:

    Jared – I’m glad to see this list. It’s a great start. What about accountability among church leaders, not specifically subordinates. How do you see this taking place? I’m referring to a specific lawsuit among one in your group. I don’t see that there is a solution to that loophole. If you have a president of an organization who has failed to follow appropriate steps, do his close connections within a group such as Gospel Coalition have an obligation to address this situation at a private level and then at a public level if they see no action taking place? This is a real problem and we will continue to see this happen until someone addresses it. Jared, I applaud you for taking the first step, but we as a church must do better.

    1. Jared C. Wilson says:

      Julie Anne, accountability among networks and affiliations is difficult and subject to the nature of those networks and affiliations.

      I know you’re referring to a specific case, but I have to respond generally and theoretically, b/c it is not true that nothing public has been said/done by brothers in The Gospel Coalition and it is not true that no action is taking place (lawsuit, verdict pending) in relation to the issue you’re referring to. That’s all I’ll say about that, for three reasons: 1) I don’t know the parties involved, neither the accused nor the accusers, so it amounts to gossip for me to host speculation, ignorance for me to pontificate, and libel for me to level charges, 2) I am not a council member of the Gospel Coalition so it is not my place to speak “for” TGC, but only for myself as a guest of TGC’s blog portal, and 3) discussion of specific cases is not what this post is about, opening illustrative link notwithstanding.

      But answering theoretically:
      Friends/associates of an accused person aren’t obligated to speak out about accusations against their associate, but sometimes it would be appropriate, yes.
      I don’t know how such accountability should take place within parachurch networks. Again, it depends on the nature of the association/network, how top-down it is, what is involved to join, etc. At the very least, in egregious cases of unrepentant sin, I suppose it would begin with removing them from the network/organization.

      Thanks for your comment.

      1. Julie Anne says:

        Thank you for your response, Jared. I think #7 needs to be expanded a bit more. I have been learning a lot about abuse in churches over the last year and one pattern I have seen in many churches is labeling crimes as sin. Rather than labeling “rape”, it is labeled as generic “sin”. Consequently, this “sin” is addressed as general sin, without acknowledging the legalities of a real crime involved. The church, in this instance becomes the law and decides how to handle the “sin” in the church, without recognizing Rom 13:1, that God has given us civil authority for use in cases of “rape”.

        I think the problem comes when we say sin is sin is sin. From a spiritual standpoint, I get that. But we have two governing authorities: church and civil. If a crime committed, it must be reported. Until pastors decide that they are responsible to report crimes to governing authorities, a lot of abuse will continue.

  10. Jared C. Wilson says:

    Counselor Brad Hambrick has a good post on response plans when abuse occurs in a church, here: http://www.bradhambrick.com/beyondprevention
    It includes a downloadable pdf of a sample Response Plan they have developed at Summit Church in NC.

  11. JeffS says:

    Jared,
    “It is amazing how often churches fail in this regard, pushing for relationships between victims and their abusers, spiritualizing some kind of reconnection as if it honors God when really it is a cheapening of grace and often just a way to sweep events under the church rug.”

    Absolutely true, and I applaud you for saying it. But sometimes abusers and abuse victims are married and the church denies the victim the right to divorce, often including shunning or excommunicating the victim if he or she feels divorce is necessary. How do you believe the church should handle these situations?

    1. Jared C. Wilson says:

      Jeff, on a case by case basis, but my personal belief, one that guides my pastoral care in these situations, is that physical and sexual abuse constitute infidelity and therefore are legitimate grounds for divorce. I know plenty of pastors/scholars disagree with that, but that’s where I am.

      1. JeffS says:

        Jared, I’m glad to hear that response and it shows a great deal of compassion, which I think is much needed in the subject of abuse. It is consistent with your statement about not pushing for relationships between victims and their abusers, which I think is an important point that so many churches are missing today.

        I admit that do wish you had not qualified abuse as “physical”, as all types abuse really boil down to the emotional damage done to the victim, but I recognize that emotional abuse is a difficult subject since it can seem so subjective, especially without training in detecting abuse.

        Thanks for taking the time to blog this post and write your response to me. I am encouraged!

  12. EMSoliDeoGloria says:

    Thank you for talking about this.

    Not sure how else to say this but every church should strive to effectively protect the most vulnerable, both structurally (policies & procedures & processes) and in its culture (transparency, accountability, public statements, etc).

    We should NEVER assume that “it” can’t happen here (whether “it” is minor-to-minor sexual abuse, adult-minor sexual abuse, domestic violence, rape, incest, bullying or any other kind of predatory situation). We should also never assume that just because someone is in a position of authority in the church that they will do the right thing. That’s why we need both a church culture that is in-hospitable to abuse and institutional structures that lay out how the church will prevent and respond to abuse.

    It is very important that law enforcement and civil authorities be brought in when a crime has occurred. Scripture is clear that God has ordained the civil authorities as a terror to evil doers – that includes evil doers who are church members.

  13. John says:

    The second half of this essay is really good on what causes some ministers to go here. Not just sexual abuse but also spiritual and emotional abuse under the guise of church discipline. There are some other really good articles on there too.

    http://www.batteredsheep.com/abusive_02.html

  14. JohnM says:

    Looking at #1 – “It will also help if volunteers in these areas are required to be members of the church..” Beside the point I know, but it ought to be a given that volunteers in any area of ministry are members of the church.

    The perpetrator was a janitor. Not someone who in the regular course of his work would normally be expected to have more than occasional, brief, casual contact with children – “good afternoon”, “how are you doing”, etc. I don’t know the answer, but that raises even more questions about…well why someone wasn’t raising more questions.

    #10 – “…people need to know where God, and thus the church, stands on abuse.” Okay, but Christians know. People sitting in churches need to know Christians don’t rape and rapists aren’t Christians. That, after all, and not generic “abuse”, was what a happened. That’s not to deny the reality and sinfulness of other forms of abuse, but part of the solution is facing stark reality and calling things what they are.

  15. JeffS says:

    JohnM,
    “#10 – “…people need to know where God, and thus the church, stands on abuse.” Okay, but Christians know. People sitting in churches need to know Christians don’t rape and rapists aren’t Christians. That, after all, and not generic “abuse”, was what a happened. That’s not to deny the reality and sinfulness of other forms of abuse, but part of the solution is facing stark reality and calling things what they are.”

    I am unsure what you are getting at here. First off, Christians don’t know. Many believe that the church will protect victims of rape, and instead there are many cases of churches forcing reconciliation between victims and abusers that are absolutely horrifying. These aren’t just fringe cases, either. It happens a lot. If you don’t know what kind of church you are in and it happens to you, you might be in for a rude awakening.

    And many well meaning pastors are just so completely unprepared to deal with abuse, when it happens they mishandle it in a way that harms the victim. For example, I know of a story of a pastor who had a man in his church who sexually assaulted a young boy. With good intention the pastor did not contact the authorities. Instead he and the family decided it was their Christian dutey to forgive, while protecting the church. So they asked the man to leave the church, which he did, but he was never arrested and charged. And he went on to work in Children’s ministry elsewhere. This pastor protected his flock, but he didn’t go far enough to see justice done. Anyone unprepared can fall into this trap, especially when you have a very “repentant” sorrowful abuser asking for mercy.

    #10 is huge and I’m so glad Jared put it on the list, because when you preach about, it won’t be glossed over or ignored. Right now, churches tend to be a safe haven for abusers. They can do their worst, “repent”, and then the church takes them in, “loves them”, and allows them to do more violence. And many people will be ok with this, finding it in the general spirit of Christian “forgiveness” if they aren’t educated about what abuse is. And yes, this includes those who rape and molest Children.

    And we do need to include “generic abuse” in this list. Whether it is rape or some other form, when you are dealing with a person who feels entitled to destroy others for his or her own desires, you are dealing with a monster that will thrive in the darkness. Preaching will shed light on these people (and give hope to their victims) that they won’t be able to stand in. The greatest ally to the abuser is ignorance.

  16. JohnM says:

    JeffS, I’ll try to explain: The charges, to which the perpetrator pleaded guilty, included first-degree rape and forcible oral sodomy of a child. Actual Christians don’t need to be told what God’s stand is on that. Maybe some antinomians do.

    In fact part of the problem is too often our churches, including our pulpits, are occupied by borderline antinomians. No, the pastor in your example had no intentions that could be characterized as good.

    As for glossing over, well that is exactly what we do when we use generic terms to talk around what happens instead of using the to-the-point terms that describe actions that are cruel, violent, perverted, and thankfully in our society, criminal.

    1. Anonymous says:

      John’s right. It’s sickening when there’s something wrong, and nobody at church is willing to talk about it, and discouraging people that do.

    2. JeffS says:

      JohnM,
      I’m tracking with you now and I think we’re on the same page for the most part. I think cheap grace absolutly creates an environment that protects and promotes abuse. However, this is why we must be intentional about preaching against it- it needs to be clear from our pulpits that you cannot just violate people and expect the church to welcome you with open arms after you tell them you’ve repented.

      In this specific case the abuser said “Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.”- this is not uncommon for victims to hear, but not just from abusers- from other (self identified) Christians! I have heard story after story of victims being told this, that they must forgive and get over it, that it is their job to suffer, that they deserved it because they were as responsble as anyone else for the abuse that Christ took- the list goes on and on.

      I agree with your point about glossing over- I misunderstood what you were saying the first time. I absolutly agree with you- we need to call the acts what they are and not mince words. I do think that Jared’s points are generally applicable to the church’s handling of many forms of abuse.

      1. Jared C. Wilson says:

        I’m not sure I’m tracking totally with the disagreement here, but I will only clarify to say that I totally agree with calling things what they are. Rape is rape. I would not advocate sanitizing what has happened in specific instances with generic terms. I use the word “abuse” throughout the post not to say that what happened in the news story wasn’t rape, but to encompass all forms of abuse.

    3. John says:

      John M.,

      Don’t forget Jesus’ last sermon before he was murdered. It went to pride, grandiosity, hypocrisy and the like of the Pharisees. Of course, rapists ought to go to jail. That’s not the point. The point is how easy it is to criticize not only people who are rapists but also those preachers that over love. The horrors. Self-righteousness blinds you from your own neediness. You are to repent from it. Jesus never used big works like Antinominians. He rebuked the scholars/priests he were so serious about their faith with big words. Self righteous people always have to have the “other” people to compare themselves to. “Those people” to look down on. Tie up heavy burdens and put them on the shoulders of others. Legalists love rules. They would rather have a rule than a relationship with people.

      http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew+23&version=NIV

      1. JohnM says:

        Antinomians hate rules. They would rather countenance any sin at any cost as long as they can maintain the illusion of a brotherly relationship with the sinner, pretending “all sin is the same”, regardless of scripture, regardless of the facts, regardless of the cost to the church, regardless of the harm to the vulnerable. The case at hand is just one particularly egregious example – Children are sexually assaulted and some church leaders prefer the holier-than-thou conceit that they are showing grace to the perpetrator over the responsibility of protecting the weak. Or telling the truth about the perpetrator.

        Of course some people are antinomians simply because they prefer to think Jesus died so they can live however they want, without consequence. Jesus calls (us) sinners sure enough – to repentance. Greviously harming others then whining about casting stones when caught is not repentance. Nowhere in scripture are we told to just say the right words then it’ll all be good. That’s something anyone with responsibility of leading a church ought to understand.

        1. JeffS says:

          “Greviously harming others then whining about casting stones when caught is not repentance. Nowhere in scripture are we told to just say the right words then it’ll all be good. That’s something anyone with responsibility of leading a church ought to understand.”

          Quoting because I can’t say it any better and it needs to be emphasized.

        2. John says:

          John M.,

          This is a great Tim Keller sermon on the dangers of prideful religion. The Flannery O’connor story pretty much sums it up. Can you believe a liberal would listen to Keller? Maybe I’m more orthodox than you think. Grab a pair of heads phones. Great sermon for those who are so sure they are going to heaven. I would love to hear your thoughts especially on the Flannery Oconnor reference.

          http://sermons2.redeemer.com/sermons/losing-my-religion-why-christians-should-drop-their-religion

        3. John says:

          Written by an evangelical minister. Worth reading the whole thing.

          “We evangelicals must accept that our beliefs are now in conflict with the mainstream culture. We cannot change ancient doctrines to adapt to the currents of the day. But we can, and must, adapt the way we hold our beliefs — with grace and humility instead of superior hostility. The core evangelical belief is that love and forgiveness are freely available to all who trust in Jesus Christ. This is the “good news” from which the evangelical name originates (“euangelion” is a Greek word meaning “glad tidings” or “good news”). Instead of offering hope, many evangelicals have claimed the role of moral gatekeeper, judge and jury. If we continue in that posture, we will continue to invite opposition and obscure the “good news” we are called to proclaim.We evangelicals must accept that our beliefs are now in conflict with the mainstream culture. We cannot change ancient doctrines to adapt to the currents of the day. But we can, and must, adapt the way we hold our beliefs — with grace and humility instead of superior hostility. The core evangelical belief is that love and forgiveness are freely available to all who trust in Jesus Christ. This is the “good news” from which the evangelical name originates (“euangelion” is a Greek word meaning “glad tidings” or “good news”). Instead of offering hope, many evangelicals have claimed the role of moral gatekeeper, judge and jury. If we continue in that posture, we will continue to invite opposition and obscure the “good news” we are called to proclaim.”

          http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/16/opinion/sunday/the-decline-of-evangelical-america.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

      2. John says:

        What are you talking about? Notice that you use the word hate and rules yet cite nothing that Jesus said to support your Pharisee based merit System. Please cite something Jesus said to support your distorted self righteous works based theology. I think he told the Pharisees to “be perfect.” There is you rules based standard. Good luck achieving that on your own self will. Jesus also said how many people have you murdered when you have gotten angry in your mind? It is sadly hilarious when people want to turn the Good News into the Bad News. Jesus would have none of it.

        1. JohnM says:

          John, I don’t need to cite anything to support theology to which I don’t subscribe. Salvation is by grace through faith – and actions indicate the reality of faith. I urge you read all of what Jesus said, and at the same time read the entire bible, not holding to a Jesus-never-personally-said doctrine, which is more commonly associated with scripture rejecting liberals. Anyway, since time and space are short, and you wanted a reference, read Matthew 7:21-23. Notice the emphasis on doing, not mere saying. And note reference to lawlesness. But like I said read the entire bible.

          1. John says:

            How many actions? What kind? Can you tell me where the line is? I’m sure you would fall on the right side of it. Funny how that works. Name the top three fruits of your life that are going to get you into heaven. Name the top three actions that would keep you out of heaven? Be honest. I would like to know so that I can be sure to get in according to John M.’s standards. Be careful puttin yourself on the judgement seat of God. Can a rapist ever be saved? An adulterer? A murderer? A cheating tax collector? I just don’t see much humility out of you. ” For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. Romans. What exactly is your theology if I have misrepresented it. Try to use small words. I’m not that smart.

        2. JeffS says:

          “It is sadly hilarious when people want to turn the Good News into the Bad News.”

          John, no one is turning the Good News into Bad News. The Good News is that God has provided salvation from those who repent, and this is grace based, not merit based. The Good News also is that God cares about the oppressed and desires for them to be protected and restored.

          What you are not seeing is the consequence that your “quick to restore” theology has on victims of evil. I have read story after story of an abused spouse was was beaten by her husband, went to her pastor, and her pastor told her that her husband was sorry so she needed to submit to him. And if she didn’t, then SHE was in sin. Or stories of child molesters who remained in the church in good standing, expecting their victims to move on and forgive- and then they do it again. Or how about a three year old who was forced by the church to “forgive” sexual abuse?

          I absolutely believe that God can restore and heal the repentant rapist, but a truly repentant heart does not cry “you must forgive me”. A truly repentant heart agrees with God about the evil it has done. A truly repentant heart does does not feel a sense of entitlement. Saying “Yes, I sinned, but you are a sinner too” is not repentance.

          Repentance isn’t something a person just speaks, but it shows up in his or her actions. And yes, an abuser can show false repentance for a while, so we have to be wary. Someone who has demonstrated the ability to destroy another human being to satisfy his or her own sense of entitlement can certainly fake it for a while. When the safety and well being of a victim is on the line, repentance of an abuser must not be accepted lightly. And even at that, laws must be obeyed and justice done.

          Our first priority must be to the victims. How many times in scripture has God commanded that his people be about justice? Not just punishing the wicked, but restoring the oppressed. When we quickly overlook the oppression of rape, violence, or other forms of abuse, we are not doing justice on behalf of the oppressed- we are siding with the oppressor.

          The Good News includes being a people who protected and defend the weak. If it isn’t, then the Good News becomes Bad News to the oppressed who will find no relief in God’s people.

  17. Very good and practical advice!

  18. Coming in late here, I know, but if anyone is interested in the biblical arguments for permitting divorce for domestic abuse, you might like to check out my book “Not Under Bondage: Biblical Divorce for Abuse, Adultery and Desertion”.

    And BTW, I consider domestic abuse does not have to include physical or sexual violence to qualify as domestic abuse. I define domestic abuse as a pattern of conduct that is designed to obtain and maintain control over the other spouse.

    It often but not always causes the victim to live in fear. It always causes grievous emotional pain, bewilderment and confusion. And it usually takes victims YEARS to realise that they being abused and that the abuse is intentional and deliberate.
    Labeling it as “Abuse” is not easy when you are suffering in the fog that abusers create by their lies and manipulations.

    1. Anonymous says:

      That’s certainly true. It’s also true for the kids who grow up in that environment. I never realized something was off about my dad until I became a teenager.

  19. JohnM says:

    John, you have indeed misrepresented my theology, on purpose or not I don’t know. In any case – By which of my fruits am I saved? By none, but rather by the propitiating sacrifice of Jesus on my behalf and through faith in Him. My hope is in the resurrection, which hope I don’t deserve and would not have at all apart from the person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ. You confuse (or pretend to, again, I don’t know)cause with results.

    Side note: As for “big words”, once again you may be pretending, for some reason some people take a perverse pride in ignorance – it’s a kind of reverse snobbery really. If you really don’t know the meaning of something that’s no shame, but get a dictionary. You’re not really dumb so don’t be intellectually lazy.

    I take Jesus at His word when I read John 6:29, and also when I read John 5:28-29. Do you? I believe, with joy, what Paul tells us in Ephesians 2:8 and also take seriously what he tells us in Ephesians 5:5-7, in Galatians 5:19-21, and Galatians 6:7. I wish more of the whole counsel of God had been pointed out to me earlier in my life. Or maybe it was and I was just blinkered by a few cherry-picked verses. Don’t you be.

  20. Jared,

    Thanks for tackling this important topic. Your readers may be interested to learn more about child abuse prevention programs and abuse reporting laws for church leaders. These resources from Christianity Today can help:

    * Reducing The Risk: http://ReducingTheRisk.com

    * Reducing The Risk kit: http://store.churchlawtodaystore.com/seabpr.html

    * The 2012 Child Abuse Reporting Laws for Churches: http://store.churchlawtodaystore.com/20chabrelafo3.html

    Best,

    Matt Branaugh
    Christianity Today’s Church Law & Tax Group

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Jared C. Wilson


Jared C. Wilson is the pastor of Middletown Springs Community Church in Middletown Springs, Vermont. You can follow him on Twitter.

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