Dec

27

2012

Justin Taylor|12:49 pm CT

Reading the Bible in 2013

Do you want to read the whole Bible?

If the average person reads 200 to 250 words per minute, and if there are about 775,000 words in the Bible, then it would take less than 10 minutes a day to read the whole Bible in a year.

(Those who want to bore into the details of how long it takes to read each book of the Bible can visit howlongdoesittaketoreadthebible.com).

Audio Bibles are usually about 75 hours long, so you can listen to it in just over 12 minutes a day.

But a simple resolution to do this is often an insufficient. Most of us need a more proactive plan.

Stephen Witmer explains the weaknesses of typical plans and offers some advice on reading the Bible together with others—as well as offering his own new two-year plan. (“In my opinion, it is better to read the whole Bible through carefully one time in two years than hastily in one year.”) His plan has you read through one book of the Bible at a time (along with a daily reading from the Psalms or Proverbs). At the end of two years you will have read through the Psalms and Proverbs four times and the rest of the Bible once.

The Gospel Coalition’s For the Love of God Blog (which you can subscribe to via email) takes you through the M’Cheyne reading plan, with a meditation each day by D. A. Carson related to one of the readings. M’Cheyne’s plan has you read shorter selections from four different places in the Bible each day.

George Guthrie’s “Read the Bible for Life Chronological Bible Reading Plan” is takes you through the whole Bible in the basic order of events, with a reading each day. There’s also a 4 + 1 plan (similar to the others, in that you read from four different places each day plus the Psalms). But it’s a semi-chronological plan, placing the prophets and the NT letters in basic chronological order.

Trey Hunter’s “The Bible-Eater Plan” is an innovative new approach that has you reading whole chapters, along with quarterly attention to specific books. The plan especially highlights OT chapters that are crucial to the storyline of Scripture and redemptive fulfillment in Christ.

For those who would benefit from a realistic “discipline + grace” approach, consider “The Bible Reading Plan for Shirkers and Slackers.” As Andy Perry explains, it takes away the pressure (and guilt) of “keeping up” with the entire Bible in one year. You get variety within the week by alternating genres by day, but also continuity by sticking with one genre each day. Here’s the basic idea:

Sundays: Poetry
Mondays: Penteteuch (Genesis through Deuteronomy)
Tuesdays: Old Testament history
Wednesdays: Old Testament history
Thursdays: Old Testament prophets
Fridays: New Testament history
Saturdays: New Testament epistles (letters)

There are a number of Reading Plans for ESV Editions. Crossway has made them accessible in multiple formats:

  • web (a new reading each day appears online at the same link)
  • RSS (subscribe to receive by RSS)
  • podcast (subscribe to get your daily reading in audio)
  • iCal (download an iCalendar file)
  • mobile (view a new reading each day on your mobile device)
  • print (download a PDF of the whole plan)
Reading Plan Format
Chronological
Through the Bible chronologically (from Back to the Bible)
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Daily Light on the Daily Path
Daily Light on the Daily Path – the ESV version of Samuel Bagster’s classic
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Daily Office Lectionary
Daily Psalms, Old Testament, New Testament, and Gospels
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Daily Reading Bible
Daily Old Testament, New Testament, and Psalms
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
ESV Study Bible
Daily Psalms or Wisdom Literature; Pentateuch or the History of Israel; Chronicles or Prophets; and Gospels or Epistles
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Every Day in the Word
Daily Old Testament, New Testament, Psalms, Proverbs
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Literary Study Bible
Daily Psalms or Wisdom Literature; Pentateuch or the History of Israel; Chronicles or Prophets; and Gospels or Epistles
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
M’Cheyne One-Year Reading Plan
Daily Old Testament, New Testament, and Psalms or Gospels
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Outreach
Daily Old Testament, Psalms, and New Testament
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Outreach New Testament
Daily New Testament. Read through the New Testament in 6 months
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email
Through the Bible in a Year
Daily Old Testament and New Testament
RSS iCal Mobile Print Email

You can also access each of these Reading Plans as podcasts:

  • Right-click (Ctrl-click on a Mac) the “RSS” link of the feed you want from the above list.
  • Choose “Copy Link Location” or “Copy Shortcut.”
  • Start iTunes.
  • Under File, choose “Subscribe to Podcast.”
  • Paste the URL into the box.
  • Click OK.

For those looking for some books to have on hand as “helps” as you read through the Bible, here are a few suggestions:

 

 

As you read through the Bible, here’s a chart you may want to to print out and have on hand. It’s from Goldsworthy’s book According to Plan. It simplified, of course, but it can be helpful in locating where you’re at in the biblical storyline and seeing the history of Israel “at a glance.”

Goldsworthy’s outline is below. You can also download this as a PDF (posted with permission).

Screen shot 2009-12-23 at 10.34.55 PM

Taken from According to Plan: The Unfolding Revelation of God in the Bible by Graeme Goldsworthy. Copyright(c) Graeme Goldsworthy 1991. Used by permission of InterVarsity Press, PO Box 1400, Downers Grove, IL 60515 (www.ivpress.com) and Inter-Varsity Press, Norton Street, Nottingham NG7 3HR England (www.ivbooks.com)

Creation by Word Genesis 1 and 2
The Fall Genesis 3
First Revelation of Redemption Genesis 4-11
Abraham Our Father Genesis 12-50
Exodus: Our Pattern of Redemption Exodus 1-15
New Life: Gift and Task Exodus 16-40; Leviticus
The Temptation in the Wilderness Numbers; Deuteronomy
Into the Good Land Joshua; Judges; Ruth
God’s Rule in God’s Land 1 and 2 Samuel; 1 Kings 1-10; 1 Chronicles; 2 Chronicles 1-9
The Fading Shadow 1 Kings 11-22; 2 Kings
There Is a New Creation Jeremiah; Ezekiel; Daniel; Esther
The Second Exodus Ezra; Nehemiah; Haggai
The New Creation for Us Matthew; Mark; Luke; John
The New Creation in Us Initiated Acts
The New Creation in Us Now New Testament Epistles
The New Creation Consummated The New Testament

Below are Goldsworthy’s summaries of each section.

Creation by Word
Genesis 1 and 2
In the beginning God created everything that exists. He made Adam and Eve and placed them in the garden of Eden. God spoke to them and gave them certain tasks in the world. For food he allowed them the fruit of all the trees in the garden except one. He warned them that they would die if they ate of that one tree.

The Fall
Genesis 3
The snake persuaded Eve to disobey God and to eat the forbidden fruit. She gave some to Adam and he ate also. Then God spoke to them in judgment, and sent them out of the garden into a world that came under the same judgment.

First Revelation of Redemption
Genesis 4-11
Outside Eden, Cain and Abel were born to Adam and eve. Cain murdered Abel and Eve bore another son, Seth. Eventually the human race became so wicked that God determined to destroy every living thing with a flood. Noah and his family were saved by building a great boat at God’s command. The human race began again with Noah and his three sons with their families. Sometime after the flood a still unified human race attempted a godless act to assert its power in the building of a high tower. God thwarted these plans by scattering the people and confusing their language.

Abraham Our Father
Genesis 12-50
Sometime in the early second millennium BC God called Abraham out of Mesopotamia to Canaan. He promised to give this land to Abraham’s descendants and to bless them as his people. Abraham went, and many years later he had a son, Isaac. Isaac in rum had two sons, Esau and Jacob. The promises of God were established with Jacob and his descendants. He had twelve sons, and in time they all went to live in Egypt because of famine in Canaan.

Exodus: Our Pattern of Redemption
Exodus 1-15
In time the descendants of Jacob living in Egypt multiplied to become a very large number of people. The Egyptians no longer regarded them with friendliness and made them slaves. God appointed Moses to be the one who would lead Israel out of Egypt to the promised land of Canaan. When the moment came for Moses to demand the freedom of his people, the Pharaoh refused to let them go. Though Moses worked ten miracle-plagues which brought hardship, destruction, and death to the Egyptians. Finally, Pharaoh let Israel go, but then pursued them and trapped them at the Red Sea (or Sea of Reeds). The God opened a way in the sea for Israel to cross on dry land, but closed the water over the Egyptian army, destroying it.

New Life: Gift and Task
Exodus 16-40; Leviticus
After their release from Egypt, Moses led the Israelites to Mount Sinai. There God gave them his law which they were commanded to keep. At one point Moses held a covenant renewal ceremony in which the covenant arrangement was sealed in blood. However, while Moses was away on the mountain, the people persuaded Aaron to fashion a golden calf. Thus they showed their inclination to forsake the covenant and to engage in idolatry. God also commanded the building of the tabernacle and gave all the rules of sacrificial worship by which Israel might approach him.

The Temptation in the Wilderness
Numbers; Deuteronomy
After giving the law to the Israelites at Sinai, God directed them to go in and take possession of the promised land. Fearing the inhabitants of Canaan, they refused to do so, thus showing lack of confidence in the promises of God. The whole adult generation that had come out of Egypt, with the exception of Joshua and Caleb, was condemned to wander and die in the desert. Israel was forbidden to dispossess its kinsfolk, the nation of Edom, Moab, and Ammon, but was given victory over other nations that opposed it. Finally, forty years after leaving Egypt, Israel arrived in the Moabite territory on the east side of the Jordan. Here Moses prepared the people for their possession of Canaan, and commissioned Joshua as their new leader.

Into the Good Land
Joshua; Judges; Ruth
Under Joshua’s leadership the Israelites crossed the Jordan and began the task of driving out the inhabitants of Canaan. After the conquest the land was divided between the tribes, each being allotted its own region. Only the tribe of Levi was without an inheritance of land because of its special priestly relationship to God. There remained pockets of Canaanites in the land and, from time to time, these threatened Israel’s hold on their new possession. From the one-man leaderships of Moses and Joshua, the nation moved into a period of relative instability during which judges exercised some measure of control over the affairs of the people.

God’s Rule in God’s Land
1 and 2 Samuel; 1 Kings 1-10; 1 Chronicles; 2 Chronicles 1-9
Samuel became judge and prophet in all Israel at a time when the Philistines threatened the freedom of the nation. An earlier movement for kingship was received and the demand put to a reluctant Samuel. The first king, Saul, had a promising start to his reign but eventually showed himself unsuitable as the ruler of the covenant people. While Saul still reigned, David was anointed to succeed him. Because of Saul’s jealousy David became an outcast, but when Saul died in battle David returned and became king (about 1000 BC). Due to his success Israel became a powerful and stable nation. He established a central sanctuary at Jerusalem, and created a professional bureaucracy and permanent army. David’s son Solomon succeeded him (about 961 BC) and the prosperity of Israel continued. The building of the temple at Jerusalem was one of Solomon’s most notable achievements.

The Fading Shadow
1 Kings 11-22; 2 Kings
Solomon allowed political considerations and personal ambitions to sour his relationship with God, and this in turn had a bad effect on the life of Israel. Solomon’s son began an oppressive rule which led to the rebellion of the northern tribes and the division of the kingdom. Although there were some political and religious high points, both kingdoms went into decline, A new breed of prophets warned against the direction of national life, but matters went from bad to worse. In 722 BC the northern kingdom of Israel fell to the power of the Assyrian empire. Then, in 586 BC the southern kingdom of Judah was devastated by the Babylonians. Jerusalem and its temple were destroyed, and a large part of the population was deported to Babylon.

There Is a New Creation
Jeremiah; Ezekiel; Daniel; Esther
The prophets of Israel warned of the doom that would befall the nation. When the first exiles were taken to Babylon in 597 BC, Ezekiel was among them. Both prophets ministered to the exiles. Life for the Jews (the people of Judah) in Babylon was not all bad, and in time many prospered. The books of Jeremiah and Ezekiel indicate a certain normality to the experience, while Daniel and Esther highlight some of the difficulties and suffering experienced in an alien and oppressive culture.

The Second Exodus
Ezra; Nehemiah; Haggai
In 539 BC Babylon fell to the Medo-Persian empire. The following year, Cyrus the king allowed the Jews to return home and to set up a Jewish state within the Persian empire. Great difficulty was experienced in re-establishing the nation. There was local opposition to the rebuilding of Jerusalem and the temple. Many of the Jews did not return but stayed on in the land of their exile. In the latter part of the fourth century BC, Alexander the Great conquered the Persian empire. The Jews entered a long and difficult period in which Greek culture and religion challenged their trust in God’s covenant promises. In 63 BC Pompey conquered Palestine and the Jews found themselves a province of the Roman empire.

The New Creation for Us
Matthew; Mark; Luke; John
The province of Judea, the homeland of the Jews, came under Roman rule in 63 BC. During the reign of Caesar Augustus, Jesus was born at Bethlehem, probably about the year 4 BC. John, known as the Baptist, prepared the way for the ministry of Jesus. This ministry of preaching, teaching, and healing began with Jesus’ baptism and lasted about three years. Growing conflict with the Jews and their religious leaders led eventually to Jesus being sentenced to death by the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate. He was executed by the Romans just outside Jerusalem, but rose from death two days afterward and appealed to his followers on a number of occasions. After a period with them, Jesus was taken up to heaven.

The New Creation in Us Initiated
Acts
After Jesus had ascended, his disciples waited in Jerusalem. On the day of Pentecost the Holy Spirit came upon them and they began the task of proclaiming Jesus. As the missionary implications of the gospel became clearer to the first Christians, the local proclamation was extended to world evangelization. The apostle Paul took the gospel to Asia Minor and Greece, establishing many churches as he went. Eventually a church flourished at the heart of the empire of Rome.

The New Creation in Us Now
New Testament Epistles
As the gospel made inroads into pagan societies it encountered many philosophies and non-Christian ideas which challenged the apostolic message. The New Testament epistles shows that the kind of pressures to adopt pagan ideas that had existed for the people of God in Old Testament times were also a constant threat to the churches. The real danger to Christian teaching was not so much in direct attacks upon it, but rather in the subtle distortion of Christian ideas. Among the troublemakers were the Judaizers who added Jewish law-keeping to the gospel. The Gnostics also undermined the gospel with elements of Greek philosophy and religion.

The New Creation Consummated
The New Testament
God is Lord over history and therefore, when he so desires, he can cause the events of the future to be recorded. All section of the New Testament contain references to things which have not yet happened, the most significant being the return of Christ and the consummation of the kingdom of God. No clues to the actual chronology are given, but it is certain that Christ will return to judge the living and the dead. The old creation will be undone and the new creation will take its place.

60 Comments

  1. The Horner plan does one thing especially well; it naturally situates you to experience biblical cross-referencing. Instead of relying on the cross-reference indexes in the center, margins, or back of your Bible, the Horner plan causes you to regularly encounter cross-references and allusions. It’s a joy to be reading something in the Law and then see it expounded in the Prophets, fulfilled in the Gospels, and proclaimed in Acts, and re-explained in the Epistles all on the same day of reading – among other kinds of reference events.

  2. Hi Justin,

    I am very greatful for this article! For the last 3 years in planing my devotionals I was always coming to your blog post. It’s a great overview and a fresh one each year.

    As far as I know you mixed up the plans by Guthrie. (Your link is called »Read the Bible for Life *Chronological* Bible Reading Plan« though it links to the general page. And in the following lines you are talking about the semi-chronological plan.)
    I followed the chronological one in 2012, there is a semi-chronological (4+1) and a starter plan (an abbridged version of the chronological).

    Thanks for your articles in 2012 (especially this one :))!

  3. I’m sure someone has already brought this to your attention, but the blog formatting is pretty badly messed up in Firefox and Safari browsers. Haven’t tried IE.

  4. I found helpful last year a 120 day reading plan that a guy at my church organised and put together. We read through it once as a church and I loved it. I blogged about the why’s and how’s on my website. I’d recommend it.

  5. Great article, Justin.
    O that we might hide His Word in our hearts, and proclaim it from our mouths!
    My preferred 2 year reading plan is http://know.gd. It is freely available online, via daily emails, and even through texting on my phone.
    Essentially, it covers the OT in two years, and the NT every year.
    Again, thanks for the time, effort & energy in ministering the Word of the Lord to us.
    Sorrowful, yet always rejoicing,
    paige

  6. [...] other Bible Reading Plans see here.) Share this:Like this:LikeBe the first to like this. This entry was posted in Reading the Bible [...]

  7. Screen goes black in Firefox and IE, running Windows 7 – I badly want to read this post, but can’t.

    Is something wrong with the formatting?

    Heather

  8. [...] are already tons of great plans out there.  Here’s a post by Justin Taylor that has several plans.  Here’s a plan from Denny Burk.  Here’s a plan from Grace For Sinners that will have [...]

  9. Is it working better now, or is the post still grayed out?

  10. Thank-you for posting this…very helpful.

  11. seems to be better now, thank you

    Weirdly, I was able to see the screen clearly from the comments page, just not the main page.

    If I’m even using the right language there — I can travel the internet, but I don’t have a clue how it works!

  12. [...] Justin Taylor: Reading the Bible in 2013 [...]

  13. [...] p.s. For more plans check out Justin Taylor’s blog! [...]

  14. I was just talking to another elder today about a need to compile a list of one year Bible reading solutions for our people this Sunday. Boom…here it is. Thanks!

  15. [...] Taylor hat erneut hilfreiche Hinweise für das fortlaufende, regelmässige Lesen der Bibel [...]

  16. [...] I’m planning to read the whole Bible next year. It’s a couple of years since I’ve done that and I miss it. I’ll still use my daily Explore notes but I think I’ll try one of Justin Taylor’s suggestions for through the Bible reading. [...]

  17. [...] Justin Taylor (The Gospel Coalition): http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/2012/12/27/reading-the-bible-in-2013/ [...]

  18. [...] of you are planning to read through the Bible in 2013.  If you need a plan, you can find several here. But before you set out to read through the Bible this year, let me warn you of two [...]

  19. [...] This is the time of year that many think about making commitments to read the Bible more regularly in the coming year.  I highly encourage everyone who desires to radically follow Christ in 2013 to prayerfully consider ways to engage the Word of God more regularly.  One of the tools that many have found useful (including myself) is a Bible Reading Plan.  There are a myriad of plans available, and Justin Taylor just posted an article this week on the Gospel Coalition Blog giving lots of helpful advice about following a Bible reading plans, as well as several links to some great plans.  (see that article here) [...]

  20. Thanks for the format correct, JT.

  21. I found this page helpful too: http://www.navpress.com/dj/content.aspx?id=138
    My first time through I used the 3rd one on this page, and it did indeed help me to see the unity of scriptures, which was a major purpose for me wanting to read through – seeing how each scripture speaks from one place into another. Each time through the Bible I notice different details and relationships too.

  22. [...] Taylor provides some helpful tools in order to read through the Scriptures next year.  Share this:FacebookTwitterGoogle [...]

  23. [...] To read Justin Taylor’s post for 2013 reading plans, click here. Also, if you struggle with whether the whole notion of resolutions is even Biblical, you may find [...]

  24. [...] Continue Reading Be Sociable, Share! Tweet window.fbAsyncInit = function() { FB.init({appId: "", xfbml: true}); FB.Event.subscribe('comment.create', function(response) { }); }; (function() { var e = document.createElement('script'); e.async = true; e.src = document.location.protocol + '//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js'; document.getElementById('fb-root').appendChild(e); }()); [...]

  25. Goldsworthy’s book has been a great asset to me in my library. Accessible to the average reader, yet packed with some great tools for Bible reading. I’m a bit ADD, so utilizing the audio function while I read keeps me on task, and moving forward, so that I don’t get caught up analyzing every connecting clause.

  26. [...] also something  many of us find hard to do on a regular basis, so thanks to Justin Taylor for this post detailing lots of ways to help get into the Bible in [...]

  27. [...] you can listen to an audible Bible or even a podcast!!! I kid you not… so much easier!!! Take a look at this post from The Gospel Coalition… it has heaps of tips and a variety of ways for you to read through your Bible in a year… and in [...]

  28. [...] for a Bible Reading schedule? Justin Taylor offers a number of proactive plans and highlights several approaches and formats for ESV Editions. [...]

  29. [...] Reading the Bible in 2013 — Justin Taylor [...]

  30. [...] post from Justin Taylor [...]

  31. [...] Read the Bible. Grab one of these great reading plans. [...]

  32. [...] Reading the Bible in 2013 [...]

  33. [...] Justin Taylor points to several resources here. [...]

  34. Another fine summary of Bible truth is available as a .pdf here on the Gospel Coalition – The Plan, by Colin Smith.

  35. [...] good plan to read through the Bible in 2013, Justin Taylor on his Gospel Coalition Blog gives one of the best, most comprehensive lists I’ve come across. I would encourage you to set aside time each day to read through the Bible [...]

  36. [...] of you may have already chosen one to use for 2013. Justin Taylor has written an extremely helpful post concerning Bible reading plans for 2013. I can do no better than he concerning this topic and I [...]

  37. I just came across your blog and found it very helpful and rewarding. Thanks for all the good content.
    Dr. Max

  38. [...] Taylor provides exactly that. Click here at Justin’s Bible Reading Plans for 2013 to find direct links to dozens of Bible reading plans to select [...]

  39. [...] Justin Taylor shares multiple plans for reading the Bible through in a [...]

  40. [...] are also a number of other good reading plans recommended by Justin Taylor, Nathan Bingham, and ESV.org.  Regardless of what you do, pick a plan and follow it, preferably [...]

  41. [...] “Reading the Bible in 2013″, by Justin Taylor [...]

  42. [...] a reading plan, do yourself a huge favour and choose one.  Numerous options can be found HERE or HERE.As well, you can view the Three Year Bible Reading Plan that our church uses. (We are just now [...]

  43. [...] can also read Justin Taylor’s superb blog about reading plans with links to all kinds of [...]

  44. [...] many have offered a number of excellent plans to work through (Justin Taylor has a helpful list here), my concern is not so much how much Bible I get through (though this year, I hope to get through [...]

  45. [...] And it is even better to read it together with others. He has given some excellent suggestions. Click here to find out more. This entry was posted in Uncategorized by pastorV. Bookmark the [...]

  46. Thank you for such a comprehensive list of resources! I particularly like the the various formats you have presented, as we all have various ways of learning/ studying. Thank you so much for the blessing this will be to my family.

  47. [...] My prayer is that whatever Bible-reading plan you choose to do in 2013, that you choose a plan that is realistic and manageable for where you are spiritually.   For many different options and good recommendations, look at this article on the Gospel Coalition blog. [...]

  48. Is there a online plan to read/translate a OT Hebrew verse and a NT Greek Verse on a daily basis like this one: http://www.amazon.com/More-Light-Path-Scripture-Readings/dp/0801021650/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357185351&sr=8-1&keywords=more+light+on+the+path

    I’d like to keep up with my Hebrew and Greek. Since the book is pretty expensive, can someone please help me find something similar online?

    Thanks.

  49. [...] the year 2012 was winding up, I found several places around the Web where pastors and others were urging Christians to prayerfully consider their [...]

  50. [...] zapoznać się z listą planów rocznego czytania Biblii, którą zamieścił na swoim blogu Justin Taylor. Poza tym warto pamiętać o kilku [...]

  51. [...] Reading the Bible in 2013 by Justin Taylor : Here you’ll find a ton of resources for different reading plans, tools, and companions to help you set and achieve your Bible-reading goals. [...]

  52. [...] liste plus complète (en anglais) de plans de lecture, je conseille l’incroyablement bonne liste de Justin Taylor. C'est sympa de partager:FacebookTwitterGoogle [...]

  53. Hi Justin,

    I read your blog in Nepal. I really liked the idea of two year Bible reading plan. I think this will work in Nepal. Our culture doesn’t read much. So, introducing a one year plan didn’t go well. I’ll introduce this plan.

    The PDF file of the plan does not flow from one page to the other well. So, I’ve created iCal format for the plan.

    PDF
    http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/tgc/files/2010/12/TGC-Two-Year-Bible-Reading-Plan1.pdf

    ICS

    https://www.google.com/calendar/ical/6cti87ls21vc2vm0aaj09s10n4%40group.calendar.google.com/public/basic.ics

    XML

    https://www.google.com/calendar/feeds/6cti87ls21vc2vm0aaj09s10n4%40group.calendar.google.com/public/basic

    HTML

    https://www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=6cti87ls21vc2vm0aaj09s10n4%40group.calendar.google.com&ctz=America/Chicago

  54. Great blog. Here is a graduated reading plan that starts with only 50 readings hitting pivotal chapters in the story line of the Bible. It then graduates up to a plan with the whole Bible (4 reading schedules total). There are also no dates with this plan. My pastor developed this plan for readers at various levels. It might help those just starting out not to get lost in the details without understanding the whole.

    http://sovgracenc.org/2012/12/storyline-of-the-bible-reading-plan/

  55. [...] Reading Plans 2013 [...]

  56. [...] Here’s a great blog post for Bible reading plans by Justin Taylor of the Gospel Coalition. *Update: Here’s his new article for 2013. [...]

  57. [...] us, many of us have a desire to “get into the Word.”  I’m with you.  There are many good reading plans to help guide you in this pursuit.  But this year I’m coming at it from a little different angle.  This year, I’m [...]

  58. [...] the 2012 update from both Justin Taylor and Ligonier Ministries; and here’s the 2013 updates from Justin Taylor, Sovereign Grace, and [...]

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