May

02

2012

Bill Kynes|10:00 PM CT

The One Thing Good Pastors Must Be Competent to Do

A pastor must be a jack-of-all-trades---spiritual leader, preacher, counselor, evangelist, Bible scholar, theologian, cultural critic, CEO, social worker, family man, and all-round good guy. No wonder we can feel overwhelmed with advice thrust at us from all sides designed to help us perform those many roles more skillfully. But what is that one thing that you must be good at if you are to be a good pastor? What is most worth your time in developing? What is the core from which everything else flows?

I have concluded that when it comes right down to it, there is really only one thing I as a pastor have to offer my congregation---and only one thing that the church has to offer the world. In my role as a pastor people come to me with all sorts of problems, but I confess: I am a physician with but one medicine to prescribe, and that is the gospel of Christ. It may need to be applied in various ways, various aspects of it may need to receive the right emphasis, and it may need to be administered in the right form. But only the gospel of Jesus Christ can heal the deepest wounds of the human heart and enable us to prosper according to God's design, bringing glory to our Lord.

The Gospel in Every Instance

The centrality of the gospel for the church is illustrated most clearly in Paul's first letter to the Corinthians. This was a church with a host of problems, and in every instance Paul's responded by expounding the gospel.

Addressing their divisions and in-fighting caused by their pride in wisdom and knowledge, Paul pointed to the foolishness of the cross of Christ (1 Cor. 1:17-18). Regarding his style of ministry---lest anyone be tempted to put their faith in human wisdom---he rejected eloquence in favor of a direct proclamation of Christ crucified (2:1-5).

Regarding the sexual immorality rampant among them, Paul urged them to get rid of the old leaven of sin from their midst, for Christ the Passover Lamb has been sacrificed (5:7). Through the gospel we are joined to Christ. How, then, can we be joined to prostitutes? "You were bought with a price," Paul said, "now honor God with your body" (6:20).

On the issue of marriage, the gospel means you can serve God in whatever circumstance you are in---whether married or single, whether slave or free. You can live out the gospel wherever God has put you, so don't be overly concerned about whether or not you are married (7:17-24). And as to eating food sacrificed in the pagan temples, the gospel prohibits us from participating in idol worship, for through the gospel we participate in Christ (10:14-17). Yet the gospel also sets us free from laws about what we eat and what we drink (8:1-8).

This pattern continues to the end of the letter. Time after time, Paul's response to the problems of this church centers on the gospel and what it ought to mean in our lives.

Thinking, Living, Pastoring

For this reason, I believe the most important thing for a pastor to be good at is deepening his grasp of God's gospel and its implications for every area of life. That is, we are to be gospel-centered in our thinking, in our living, and in our pastoring.

That may seem too obvious to be worth saying, but there is nothing impressive about this gospel message. It has nothing to do with human achievement and everything to do with God's grace. The gospel is not about the high and mighty but the weak and lowly. It's not about self-promotion but self-abasement. It's about serving others rather than being served. Blessed are the poor in spirit, the meek, and those who know they are sick. It's about a road to glory paved by the stones of suffering, following a Savior who calls us to come and die to ourselves. Putting the gospel at the center does not come naturally, nor is it encouraged by our culture (nor, sadly, by our churches).

The challenge for us all is not to drift away from this God-glorifying, self-abasing gospel. We must not assume it and then go on to other things---even good things. For these things will eventually displace the gospel as the center of our ministry. For that reason you must "keep watch," as Paul urged Timothy, over your life and doctrine (1 Tim. 4:16).

Who We Are, Not What We Do

What does this look like for a pastor? First, we must let the gospel shape our own lives before we minister to others. We must remember that pastoring is, first of all, not about our "ministry skills" but who we are as men "in Christ," called as God's servants to shepherd his flock. This means growing in our reverence for God's holiness, which the cross of Christ so clearly reveals. God hates sin, and so must we. This means humbly acknowledging the need of our own hearts to be cleansed by Christ's precious blood and then seeking the sanctifying power of the Spirit. It means engaging in those "means of grace" that keep pointing us to God's gracious gospel and spur us on to love and good deeds. It means reading the Word with a view to a change in our own hearts---relying on the Spirit to give life through it. It means forgiving as the Lord has forgiven us. It means praying as a way of abiding in Christ, for only then can we bear real fruit.

Our love for Christ needs the reinforcement of others who also share that love. That's why we need "spiritual friendships" with like-minded brothers who can provide encouragement and accountability. In guarding our lives, we need to say no to the first sign of temptation, whether it be to click on an inappropriate website and indulge in lust or to reflect on the success (or failure) of another's ministry and indulge in envy, pride, or self-pity. We must strive to share the heart of our Savior in his love and in his humility---seeking to develop a soft heart and a thick skin in all our relationships with people.

We are to be models of Christian living, not just Christian working, for the gospel calls us to make Christ Lord of all. So how the gospel affects our marriages and family life is just as much a part of our ministry as our public preaching. The gospel is lived out at home through the self-giving love for our wives and raising our children with grace and truth. All this is included in a gospel-centered life.

We are to watch our lives, and we are to watch our teaching---making sure the gospel informs all that we say. We must keep taking our hearers to the cross, for that's where the Bible points us, whatever the text of our sermon. We must beware of moralism and continue preaching grace. That grace becomes all the more amazing as we expound the majesty and holiness of God from the whole of Scripture!

Evangelize, Read, Make Friends

So how do we keep deepening our understanding of the gospel? One way is to find opportunities to engage in evangelism. Sharing the gospel with unbelievers sharpens our own appreciation of its goodness, truth, and beauty.

And without question, we must be readers. But make sure that the first book you read, over and over again, is the Bible. Let its words soak into your soul. Enter into the world it displays---a world in which God acts in creation, judgment, redemption, and consummation to fulfill his gracious purpose in the gospel. Then read devotional literature by writers who feed your soul as well as your mind. Then read theological and biblical works that sharpen your understanding. Then read other books---good fiction, science, sociology, history, politics---all of which can broader our understanding of the world into which the gospel is preached as the ultimate answer to all life's questions.

Yes, it is beneficial to find ways to sharpen your pastoral skills---in leadership, preaching, counseling, and administration. But most importantly, keep the main thing the main thing. We are ministers of the gospel of Jesus Christ, and that gospel must shape our lives and inform every aspect of our ministry.

Bill Kynes is senior pastor of Cornerstone Evangelical Free Church in Annandale, Virginia, and a Council member of The Gospel Coalition.

Categories: Ministry
  • http://matthiasmedia.com/briefing/ Sandy Grant

    Thanks for this reminder Bill. Preach the gospel of Jesus, and preach it to yourself first. I needed to hear that today. And yesterday. And will tomorrow.

  • Anonymous

    Very good.

    But nothing about prayer? Prayer to enable us to grow closer to the gospel as we embrace the Trinity.

    • Robert Wille

      Pastor Kynes cites prayer, under "Who We Are, Not What We Do".

      • Anonymous

        Apologies for skipping over that. Extremely good post then!

  • neil

    "A pastor must be a jack-of-all-trades---spiritual leader, preacher, counselor, evangelist, Bible scholar, theologian, cultural critic, CEO, social worker, family man, and all-round good guy."

    According to the New Testament what you have just described is more like a Pharisee than a pastor.Where in scripture is one man to do all these things? Once again another pastor writes an article about the problems of pastoring when the problem IS the modern UNBIBLICAL role of the "pastor". Brother, please understand that what they taught you in seminary is what they were taught in seminary.

    "No wonder we can feel overwhelmed with advice thrust at us from all sides designed to help us perform those many roles more skillfully."

    Again, no one is to be overwhelmed within the body of Christ because all believers are gifted spiritually to handle any situation because their head is Christ. Passivity and problems among the 'congregation" are a result of a system which can lead a pastor to become burned out or egotistical. They either are overwhelmed because they have little control or they become gods because they have all the control.

    What you do have right in this article is that all believers are to preach the Gospel. If any self-proclaimed "pastor" is going to stand before a body of people tp preach, it better be the Gospel. Every church door is open to an unbeliver and they walk into the churches every weekend. They need to hear the grace and truth of the Lord Jesus Christ. The perfect example of this is in Acts 2 where you hear Peter proclaiming that Jesus Christ is the Messiah.
    Acts 2:37 Now when they heard this, they were pierced to the heart, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, “Brethren, what shall we do?”

    • Steve

      If you had read the first sentence in the context of the second, not to mention the rest of the article, you would have gotten the point. The "advice coming from all sides" is that the "pastor must be a jack-of-all-trades." He distinguishes this "advice" from proper Gospel thinking.

      You seem to know Bill well enough to comment on his seminary education. I too know Bill. I have known him personally for the better part of a decade, have heard him preach through the Bible week after week during that time, and if you know Bill half as well as I do you would know that he is a man who is always focused on the Gospel. In fact, in the rest of the article Bill is reasserting the primacy of the Gospel above those other so-called must-have traits. See this passage here:

      "The challenge for us all is not to drift away from this God-glorifying, self-abasing gospel. We must not assume it and then go on to other things---even good things. For these things will eventually displace the gospel as the center of our ministry."

      No believer is gifted spiritually to handle every situation. Some are called to be prophets, some pastors, some teachers, .... We are many parts in one body, and we all have a role to play. This too is Gospel truth, that we are freed from worldly expectations to do good works, which God has prepared for us in advance, knowing our abilities, strengths, and weaknesses.

      • Neil

        Steve,
        You said,
        //"If you had read the first sentence in the context of the second, not to mention the rest of the article, you would have gotten the point. The "advice coming from all sides" is that the "pastor must be a jack-of-all-trades." He distinguishes this "advice" from proper Gospel thinking."//

        Please answer my question Steve. The “Senior Pastor” position is the problem. The NT always speaks of a plurality of elders. Most pastors do not get this because they have come to believe that their position is biblical. Sure there are some “pastors” who wisely and humbly seek the advice of spirit led elders. The same can be said that there are rebel pastors who run the “show” (literally) and have hirelings under their care who worship every word they say. How many pastors will step forward and say,… You know what,... I believe the position I hold is unbiblical.
        They will not do this because it is their livelihood. They have been taught this ever since they felt led to be a pastor. They are taught this in the seminaries because pastors built these seminaries. What do they teach about 1 Tim and Titus? They teach that the paid professional has superseded the scripture and twist the word of God to suit their unbiblical roles. They will use excuses such as we need to conform to culture or we are not like the 1st century church, etc. etc. Then when someone like me comes forward and points this out, we are labeled divisive and uneducated. Since I came to Christ, I sought wisdom through the Holy Spirit because I asked for wisdom from God. Do I need to know Greek and study theology to become a better Christian? Instead I get to read books and blogs by pastors who say they need to do a better job of pastoring.

        //"You seem to know Bill well enough to comment on his seminary education. I too know Bill. I have known him personally for the better part of a decade, have heard him preach through the Bible week after week during that time, and if you know Bill half as well as I do you would know that he is a man who is always focused on the Gospel. In fact, in the rest of the article Bill is reasserting the primacy of the Gospel above those other so-called must-have traits."//

        That is one of the problems too. I do not know Bill. Should believers read every blog or book with the assumption that what some pastor writes is true? Of course, not, we need to examine OURSELVES daily to see if we are remaining in the faith. How much more should we test all things? Every believer should be testing what the pastor says every time he enters the pulpit.(If they are not preaching the Gospel they should not preach anything.) Just as you should not take my word for what I am writing, I must not take Bill’s or your words for what you say. We all need to test it against the infallible and inerrant word of God. Herein lays the crux of the problem when it comes to church polity and the roles of the pastor, priest, vicar or pope. In most cases, the problem of interpreting the word pertaining to these issues is not with faulty hermeneutics or exegesis, the problem is in the heart.

        //“No believer is gifted spiritually to handle every situation. Some are called to be prophets, some pastors, some teachers, .... We are many parts in one body, and we all have a role to play. This too is Gospel truth, that we are freed from worldly expectations to do good works, which God has prepared for us in advance, knowing our abilities, strengths, and weaknesses.” //

        I agree. The head of the body is Christ and He is the only one that should be labeled "Senior Pastor." He is the Vine and we are the branches. So let us take a serious look at the flawed system of the present day pastor. Instead of writing books and blogs on how the pastor needs to do a better job, we should humbly go before the throne of God, ask for wisdom on these matters, and believe what the spirit says through His word.

        • Steve

          In our church, the teaching pastor is under the authority of a plurality of elders. We pay those people who already feel a calling to and have an aptitude for the preaching ministry to free them from the responsibility of seeking secular employment so that they can fully devote themselves to their craft.

          I can't identify where in scripture a government by plurality of elders excludes someone from a full-time teaching role. Assuming I've correctly identified your concern, could you take the time to walk me through your reasoning based upon scripture?

          (edited to add:)

          For the sake of clarification, I don't think that a full-time teaching pastor being present in the pulpit gives license for any church member to absolve themselves of the responsibility of using the scripture as a yardstick by which teaching from any person - pastor or no - is measured.

          • Neil

            ///”In our church, the teaching pastor is under the authority of a plurality of elders. We pay those people who already feel a calling to and have an aptitude for the preaching ministry to free them from the responsibility of seeking secular employment so that they can fully devote themselves to their craft.”//
            //”I can't identify where in scripture a government by plurality of elders excludes someone from a full-time teaching role. Assuming I've correctly identified your concern, could you take the time to walk me through your reasoning based upon scripture?”//

            To start with, one needs to define the definition of “church”. If we are talking about a congregation that meets in a building at set times during the week, we are not talking about the church of the Lord Jesus Christ. This "church congregation" concept is referring to the institutionalized church with a governing body of leaders/clergy that coordinate and administer over the laypeople. If we look at Matthew 20 where Jesus is speaking to the indignant disciples about who shall be first He said:
            Matthew 20:25-28 “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them. It shall not be so among you. But whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be your slave, even as the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

            The basic “church” of today models what Jesus said must not be. The clergy lord over the people because they have expectations due to a salary that demands results. They either burn out or become egotistical. They are also at the mercy of the layperson when it comes to income. If they rebuke a heavy tither, they stand a chance to lose money. There is an underling feeling that their performance will reflect in their income. This pressure can be incredible and often leads to them staffing people under them who all but worship them. This tithe (which is biblical, but not Christian) is expected to pay for their salaries, health insurance, pension, (retirement?), housing, automobiles etc. etc. Add the cost of building, staffing and maintaining some churches that rival university campuses and you have something that models a secular corporation. Those who have a calling to preach are only doing so because they believe that the modern pastor represents what Christ intended the church to be. They go into a seminary program that teaches them to be preaching pastors. They stand on a raised platform and speak into the lives of 100’s and maybe 1000’s of people with a prepared sermon. Those in attendance may or may not be saved because the doors are opened to anyone. This is not to say that this is a bad thing to let anyone into a building to hear someone preach. What is in question is how can an unsaved person worship in spirit and truth if they are not saved? Is not the Sabbath morning service a time of worship for believers? What is interesting is that you said they can fully devote to their craft. The craft of preaching (evangelizing, teaching, prophesying) is a spiritual gift that one does not learn from a seminary or bible college. It is a gift by the Holy Spirit that directs the believer’s actions.

            The true church, the body of Christ, is those individuals who have by faith trusted in the Lord Jesus Christ as their Savior. They are a royal priesthood that is gifted individually in order that the body may be unified for edification and sanctification. The body of Christ should meet more than once a week to encourage each other, care for each other, confess sins to each other and praise God for His mercy and grace. Since we are all gifted there should be many pastors (shepherds) among the body. There should be elders (not 20 or 30 year old seminary students) that accurately fit the descriptions of 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:5-9 who lead by example and not by lording over the body.(1 Peter 5:1-3) The body chooses these men by the help of the Holy Spirit. These men are to receive double honor. This double honor is not referring to salary, but greater respect. Any man that falls under the guidelines laid out in these scriptures will be regarded such. They may receive monetary gifts but if they are adequately compensated in their work, the money would most likely go to the needy in the church body.Modern “pastors” will use 1 Cor 9:1-14 as a way to justify salary and compensation. This cheery picking of scripture is dangerous and we can all fall into using bits and pieces of God’s word to suit our own agendas. Paul is a great example of someone sold out to the Gospel. If you read 1 Cor 9:15-19 he would rather die than take compensation for preaching the Gospel. How many pastors would forgo their salaries and livelihood to preach the Gospel? It is a sad thought knowing that someone requires a salary to preach something that no amount of money can buy.

            • Steve

              You said:

              "The basic “church” of today models what Jesus said must not be. The clergy lord over the people because they have expectations due to a salary that demands results. They either burn out or become egotistical."

              Respectfully, you jump from a false assumption ("lording over people" being an inescapable behavior, which it is not) to a false dichotomy (burn-out or egotism). You then proceed to paint all churches with a paid pastorate with the same broad brush.

              I agree that the outcomes you state above are possible (there are several mega-churches and movements that testify to that), but there are several others you neglect to mention, and one among them being that a congregation shares what it has gratefully to the one who teaches (Gal 6:6), who does not lord over the congregation but humbly presents a consistent Gospel message.

              You said:

              "They are also at the mercy of the layperson when it comes to income. If they rebuke a heavy tither, they stand a chance to lose money. There is an underling feeling that their performance will reflect in their income.

              The fact that a pastor is paid or not is irrelevant in this case: an unpaid teacher could have the same fear of rebuking a heavy tither because of the impact that the loss of giving could have on the church. But we should fear God rather than men. Deliver the rebuke where it is needed, and God will work His will whether the person involved decides to keep tithing or not.

              You said:

              "This pressure can be incredible and often leads to them staffing people under them who all but worship them."

              I have never seen this in any church I have ever attended, although of course I have seen occasional news of spectacular flame-outs in other congregations. I view this as an exception and not the rule.

              You said:

              "Those in attendance may or may not be saved because the doors are opened to anyone. This is not to say that this is a bad thing to let anyone into a building to hear someone preach. What is in question is how can an unsaved person worship in spirit and truth if they are not saved? Is not the Sabbath morning service a time of worship for believers?"

              Sure it is. And I agree that an unsaved person can't worship in spirit and truth because they do not have the Spirit within them. The pastor's job is to preach the Gospel message, letting the seed fall where it may, whether there are unsaved people present or not. His job is not to tickle the ears of the people gathered before him but to present the unvarnished Gospel truth.

              We have international students who attend our church. For some of them from countries closed to Christianity, it may be the only time they will ever hear the Gospel proclaimed. We take our responsibility to them seriously, that they would know that they are sinners standing before a holy God, and that the same God offers them salvation and reconciliation through the death and resurrection of His Son.

              You said:

              "What is interesting is that you said they can fully devote to their craft. The craft of preaching (evangelizing, teaching, prophesying) is a spiritual gift that one does not learn from a seminary or bible college. It is a gift by the Holy Spirit that directs the believer’s actions."

              Its source is the Holy Spirit, but it is a discipline that can be honed through study.

              You said:

              "The true church, the body of Christ, is those individuals who have by faith trusted in the Lord Jesus Christ as their Savior. They are a royal priesthood that is gifted individually in order that the body may be unified for edification and sanctification. The body of Christ should meet more than once a week to encourage each other, care for each other, confess sins to each other and praise God for His mercy and grace."

              Agreed.

              You said:

              "Since we are all gifted there should be many pastors (shepherds) among the body. There should be elders (not 20 or 30 year old seminary students) that accurately fit the descriptions of 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:5-9 who lead by example and not by lording over the body.(1 Peter 5:1-3)."

              Yes. At churches I have attended, we have had a paid teaching pastor along with other pastors and elders, all of whom meet scriptural qualifications you outline. They are not mutually exclusive.

              You said:

              "The body chooses these men by the help of the Holy Spirit. These men are to receive double honor. This double honor is not referring to salary, but greater respect. Any man that falls under the guidelines laid out in these scriptures will be regarded such. They may receive monetary gifts but if they are adequately compensated in their work, the money would most likely go to the needy in the church body."

              None of the pastors in churches I've attended have been exorbitantly compensated beyond what is necessary to maintain a modest living. I certainly am aware, however, that pastors at some of the larger churches command salaries that would rival that of a NFL coach. I think your criticism, aimed at them, is on-target.

              You said:

              "Modern “pastors” will use 1 Cor 9:1-14 as a way to justify salary and compensation. This cheery picking of scripture is dangerous and we can all fall into using bits and pieces of God’s word to suit our own agendas. Paul is a great example of someone sold out to the Gospel. If you read 1 Cor 9:15-19 he would rather die than take compensation for preaching the Gospel. How many pastors would forgo their salaries and livelihood to preach the Gospel? It is a sad thought knowing that someone requires a salary to preach something that no amount of money can buy."

              Paul may have forgone a salary but he still had a livelihood. He was a tent-maker. He had to eat. And he had his reasons peculiar to the Corinthian church that led him to refuse their money.

              Our church made the decision to free our pastor from the responsibility of holding secular employment so that he could put that time toward the service of the Kingdom. And he has made effective use of that time. I do not see much of a difference between the pastor who accepts a salary and boasts of his own competence and a pastor who rejects a salary and boasts of his own self-righteousness. It is what is in the heart that matters -- what goes into a man does not defile, but what comes out.

  • Greg

    This seemed a lot more like a list of things pastors should be doing additionally.

    Maybe we should start with this notion: Apart from Christ we can do nothing. Not just in the church but in all realms of life. A pastor above all things needs to lose themselves to Christ. That is the one thing a pastor needs to do.

    • Steve

      Where you see a list of things pastors should be doing additionally, I just see a call to return to the basics:

      1. Soak yourself in the Word
      2. Pray without ceasing
      3. Share your faith
      4. Walk your talk

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  • Eric Nielsen

    Thanks Bill, I really appreciated this article. It is plain and straightforward in reminding us why to keep the main thing the main thing in gospel ministry. I am heading to Seminary with my wife soon and I fear that I will gain a lot of information which would not lead to transformation. Its encouraging to know though that as long as my focus at school is on the gospel, I can only grow in His grace

  • Marc V.

    Very good blog. Wether we are taught in seminary or not of the duties of pastoral leadership, we certainly can look to Christ as an example of the ultimate Shepherd! Our sheep are needy, we need to be a jack-of-all-trades to minister to them more than ever. However, by exemplifying Christlikeness through the duties of pastoral leadership we can have a big impact on our sheep. I especially enjoyed the last topic, "Evangelize, read, and make friends." Evangelism is the center of which all duties of church leadership grow. A church without strong evangelism as its center will be hard to lead, and weak in discipleship. A pastor must exemplify evangelism in his leadership. It was said by someone, a person who stops reading is a person who has stopped learning. You put everything into context in your last section, very good blog, again.

  • Neil

    Steve, I apologize by saying that all pastors are led to be burned-out of become prideful. I did not mean to paint all churches with this broad brush of burnout and egotism. Please forgive me. However, to say that the senior pastors do not struggle with these issues would be false. Those who do hold to the biblical model of a plurality of elders are least likely not to burnout or become consumed with pride.

    “The fact that a pastor is paid or not is irrelevant in this case: an unpaid teacher could have the same fear of rebuking a heavy tither because of the impact that the loss of giving could have on the church.”

    It is relevant. Anyone required to perform a job is subject to criticism and in danger of being replaced. There is a measure of pressure on the pastor to perform. Most churches that select a new pastor for their congregation will look at the resume of the applicant to see where he was educated. The expectation of a congregation will lie heavily upon the one in the position of pastoring them. This matter is even more complicating when the pastor is a 20 something fresh out of seminary. Their salaries are based upon their experience. Since when are seminaries and bible colleges the requirement for a “pastor”? Simply put, pastors who make incredible amounts of money run these seminaries. They pass on their knowledge and ways to those they teach. What they "should do" as much as "what they neglect to do" is the issue. Let us say a layperson rebukes a wayward heavy tithing brother. Could the layperson who rebukes the heavy tither come under the wrath of the pastor? Yes. I have experienced this first hand. What are his reasons to do this? Could his salary effect his decision in anyway?

    “Its source is the Holy Spirit, but it is a discipline that can be honed through study.”

    What is your source for this statement? Is a man’s own intellect and fervent study going to supersede what the Holy Spirit does through the believer?

    I just want to say that I appreciate the exchange in dialogue and that I have no doubt that you, Bill and the Gospel Coalition has a passion for Christ. I just know that I have a passion for the church and that we all need to examine the way we are doing things in our culture and not rely, lean on or take for granted what we have been taught over the years. God’s word is clear that the falling away must occur before the last days. The current one-pastor system would be a perfect doorway for the son of perdition to enter the scene. We need to examine and test everything to the word of God and see if we are in the faith and be on guard for the sake of the body. I believe the Holy Spirit is moving in these days and we believers should be joyfully awaiting the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ.

  • mckay caston

    Thanks so much for this post, Bill. As you say, the focus of a teaching pastor's role is to be a "physician of the soul." So encouraging and helpful... brings my calling into a much clearer focus. Spot on and just what I needed to hear today!

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