Category Archives: Uncategorized

Cru Inner City’s Circle of Hope Strategy

One of the ministries I appreciate a great deal is cru inner city. Men like John Sather and others like him around the country are seeking to take the gospel into the core of cities across the country. Here’s a 3-minute video describing their partnership initiative with local churches called “The Circle of Hope.” Check it out:

Our Strategy – The Circle of Hope from Cru Inner City on Vimeo.

Check out the cru inner city/here’s life inner city website to learn more.

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Around the Blog in 80 Seconds

This past week has featured some good reading around the blogosphere. Listed below are some posts I enjoyed:

Sunday (23rd)

Charles M. Blow, “Thomas Speaks… Blindly about Race.” Loved this paragraph:

We must stop having these juvenile discussions of race and face down the big questions: How can we help people see a thing so vaporous? How can we help direct dialogue among individuals about things happening on a grand scale? How can we help avoid victim and guilt fatigue in addressing problems whose formation was glacial and whose undoing is likely to be so as well? And how can we encourage people to fight on two fronts at once: holding the culture responsible for allowing and even nurturing roadblock biases, while still encouraging individuals to make every effort to overcome those biases, identifying and eliminating self-destructive behaviors?

Monday (24th)

The Preaching of William Still

I received a real gift in a comment from Malcolm Duff, who read a post I’d written some time back on William Still’s book, The Work of the Pastor. Still was used of God to impact many better known men in the evangelical world today. He pastored Gilcomstom Church in Scotland for 52 years (1945-1997). He was committed to the exposition of God’s word, but I’d never heard him or knew his sermons were available. Then this gift called Tapes from Scotland which makes available some of Still’s preaching.

Kevin DeYoung shows us how to charitably but critically critique a book in his review of Young, Restless, No Longer Reformed

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Two New Sites Dedicated to Thinking About “Race”

“Race” is a perenniel problem. It seems inescapable and good thinking about “race,” racism, “post-race” and the like can be difficult to find. Even those who think about it professionally have difficulty managing the spiraling issues that “race” spawns. Because of that, we might be tempted to think we need less thinking, writing and discussion of “race,” not more.

But the reality is that unless we apply ourselves to thinking biblically, carefully and hopefully about these things we won’t make progress. We can’t acquire a new mindset or escape the quagmire of “race” and racism by osmosis. We’re going to have to do some hard work.

That’s why I’m glad to highlight two new sites dedicated to the cause.

The first is a site called “The Gospel and Race“. It’s a new joint venture between Soong Chan-Rah and Anthony Bradley.

The second is Eraçe Ourselves. It’s a new blog dedicated to imagining and pursuing a world  where “race” as a construct no longer defines the way we think of ourselves and others. I plan to post there about once a week or so. I’d love it if you would join me there and, more importantly, join me in the project of fostering a biblical view of humanity’s unity and a celebration of God-given diversity rightly understood.

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My Son Shoots David Platt Preaching

So it looks like my son, Titus, has been bitten by the shutter bug, too. He’s been asking for a camera of his own for a while. And every chance he gets, he borrows my camera or his sister’s to take a few snaps. He’s actually pretty good. At least he consistently shoots better shots than I do. Case in point: Here are a string of snaps he took of David Platt preaching at #CROSScon last week.

Two quick reactions:

1. This is not bad for a seven year old; and

2. Captures the subject pretty well.

Also posted in preaching | | 5 Comments

Tweets and Links (Jan. 18, 2014)

A few of the things that encouraged and edified me this past week:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also posted in Around the Blog, blogging | | Leave a comment

Cross: Day 4 in Pictures

Here are a few snaps from the final powerful day of #CROSScon 2013:

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Cross: Day 3 in Pictures

Here’s a sampling of shots taken on the third day of the conference.

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Cross: Day 2 in Pictures

I’m still rejoicing in the Spirit-filled fellowship and teaching of #CROSScon this past week. Honestly, it perhaps tops my list of conferences where the presence and power of God were most palpably sensed. For some time to come I’ll be sorting through the many profound moments of insight and illumination gained in those four days. But in the meantime, some more pics capturing some moments on day 2 (see day 1 here).

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Duck Dynasty and the Twisted Ironies of Our Current Sexual Politics

Well, our Duck Dynasty friends have found themselves in the news again. The show has been something of an inexplicable (to me, at least) pop culture phenomenon. Not since Jeff Foxworthy’s “you might be a redneck” routines has redneck culture  been so prominent and acceptable and marketable.

But this time Duck Dynasty finds itself on the receiving end of a media backlash that one could predict with just a little exposure to our current cultural climate on sexuality. The now infamous GQ interview with Mr. Phil Robertson has caused something of a furor surrounding the surprisingly popular Duck Dynasty show.

Watching from the distance of a Caribbean island, which is not to be confused with watching from an impartial distance, several ironies surface for me.

1. It’s ironic that a “vulgar” rejection of certain sexual acts cannot co-exist with visual and verbal sexual vulgarity itself.

2. It’s ironic that “vile” remarks are rejected while the vile acts they describe are celebrated.

3. It’s ironic that an end to the censorship of certain sex acts should be accompanied by the use of censorship.

4. It’s ironic that one’s job can be taken away because of their view of human sexuality while sexual orientation is protected against job descrimination.

5. It’s ironic that young girls can parade themselves as hyper-sexualized beings on major awards shows and older men be vilified for graphically expressing their sexual interest.

6. It’s ironic that “wisdom” on the side of normative sexual ethics requires the use of rhetorical restraint while “tolerance” of deviant sexual ethics …

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How to Make a Confession and Extend Forgiveness

It seems God is pleased to teach much of the evangelical world how to make confessions and to extend forgiveness. From comments made in panel discussions about Christian hip hop to radio confrontations over proper citation of written material, we’ve seen a lot of calls for apologies and opportunities for practicing the difficult discipline of forgiving.

This morning I woke up thinking about one of the most helpful and simple set of guidelines for making full confessions of wrongdoing in the hopes of being forgiven and extending complete and joyful forgiveness of the same. It’s called “The Seven A’s of Confession” and “The Four Promises of Forgiveness” published by Peacemaker Ministries. You can read more about these principles at the Peacemaker website or in Ken Sande’s book, The Peacemaker

Here are the principles with a brief sentence of explanation.

The Seven A’s of Confession (see Matt. 7:3-5; 1 John 1:8-9; Prov. 28:13)

1. Address everyone involved.

We haven’t fully confessed a sin or wrongdoing until we engage all those affected. If the situation happened between two people, then the two involved should be addressed. If I wronged someone before a group, then the group should be addressed.

2. Avoid “if,” “but” and “maybe.”

These are magic words that actually erase the apology. They shift blame or nullify the apology. “If you hadn’t….” “I wouldn’t have ____ but you….” “Maybe things would have been different if… but….” Rarely does this feel like a sincere apology to those who have been wounded or wronged.

3. Admit specifically.

General “I’m …

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