Nov

29

2012

Trevin Wax|2:26 am CT

Worth a Look 11.29.12

Kindle Deal of the Day: The Path of Celtic Prayer: An Ancient Way to Everyday Joy by Calvin Miller. $0.99.

In uncertain and dangerous days of high infant-mortality rates, leprosy and plagues, the Celts breathed candid prayers out of the reality of their lives: Desperate prayers for protection. Praise for the God who was king over all creation. Honest prayers of confession. In these pages, Miller introduces us to six types of Celtic prayer that can connect us to God more deeply by helping us pray out of the circumstances and uncertainties of our own life.

Kevin DeYoung on taking a break from social media:

 I think you should consider a fast periodically—for a few days, a week, or maybe longer. Here’s how I benefited from being away (more or less) for two weeks.

A great review of Ross Douthat’s Bad Religion that concludes with this timely word:

Praise God for Douthat’s models—Reinhold Niebuhr, C.S. Lewis, Billy Graham, and others like them—believers who’ve gained cultural prominence and used that influence to add salt and shed light. But plenty more through the centuries have been just as faithful and have been ridiculed or even killed by the powers that be. Where we fall on that continuum is in God’s hands, and to whatever extent we aim at the respect of the world we’re asking for trouble.

The Big Story of Scripture In Pictures: Your Input Requested

My question to you, my readers, what might you change or add to these graphics? Do they correctly convey the grand narrative of Scripture? Are they understandable to the unchurched and helpful to mature believers?

Thoughts for Guest Preachers and the Churches that Invite Them:

Preached recently at a church that hosted me with remarkable thoughtfulness and it caused me to reflect on how inviting churches can host as well as my most recent experience, and also what should be the specific aims of a guest preacher. To be filtered through your own wisdom and good sense.

Don’t Pastor People with a Book:

Leaders, don’t pastor people with a book. Instead, shepherd people with yourself. The people of your city need to be personally known and loved, not simply prescribed a reading list or to-do list.

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