Feb

19

2013

Trevin Wax|3:14 am CT

10 Sure Signs We’ve Lost Our Minds

Documenting the bizarre beliefs and inconsistencies that surface in contemporary discourse…

1. We worry about the shallowness and superficiality of online relationships, so we go to FaceBook and Twitter to register our concerns.

2. We are so focused on the newest and latest things that we leave behind the oldest and most foundational things.

3. We’ve turned the virtue of prudence into the vice of prudishness and the vice of impropriety into the virtue of authenticity.

4. We ban soda from schools but make condoms widely available… because corn syrup is a more serious matter for youngsters than sex.

5. We decry the exploitation of women, but cry “censorship” when someone wants decency standards against objectifying women on television.

6. We chide a pregnant mother for smoking because of the harm it does to her child, but we applaud her choice to walk into a clinic and have her baby torn limb by limb and extracted from her uterus.

7. It’s arrogant to buck the current push to redefine marriage, but not arrogant to buck the consensus of virtually every society before us.

8. Citizens who would like to keep the money they earn are “greedy.” Politicians who would take their wealth and give it away are “generous.”

9. We believe in tolerance: everyone can believe whatever they want (as long as they don’t really believe it).

10. We believe every religion should be open and inclusive, but not open and inclusive enough for a Jesus who claims to be Lord of all. 

~~~ Frustrated with our failure to live up to our ideals, we do away with them altogether. And then we feel better for being worse. ~~~

Categories: Life & Culture, Politics

| Print This

 
 
 

86 Comments

  1. [...] http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/trevinwax/2013/02/19/10-sure-signs-weve-lost-our-minds/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in KFD. Bookmark the permalink. ← What Does It Mean to Have Been Created In the “Image of God”? [...]

  2. The common theme of these poignant ten points is that what is profane has become normal, while what is more normal is seen as profane. Losing your mind is not just outright bizarre behavior seen visible in public, it is the day-to-day belief that our sin is normal and consensus which builds towards an acceptance of that belief.

    Number one hits well, about Facebook and Twitter, because today communication has become so impersonal. To communicate concerns face-to-face with peers is becoming a lost art.

    Number four, to protect the health of youth is admirable, but to prioritize pleasure and something that should be for marriage…not good. When sexuality becomes unrestrained and no boundaries are given, the consequences are immense. We become a society prison-bound by pleasure rather than freedom.

    Number six, no comment. So true.

    Again, well-written. This cultural shift today is not something that people express verbally in their daily life. Belief leads to action. Whether in the Gospel towards repentance, or in these ideas of the world; it’ll lead to some action in your life. Or inaction.

  3. Lost people acting lost. Who could’ve seen THAT coming?

    Smells like end-times-stuff to me.

  4. [...] Reblogged from Kingdom People [...]

  5. Awesome and so true!!! Reblogged it on my personal blog:

    http://carmenisabelgonzalez.wordpress.com/2013/02/19/10-sure-signs-weve-lost-our-minds/

    Blessings! :)

  6. Great points.
    #8 Should be taken with a pinch of salt, please do not justify amassing wealth with the backdrop of pretentious politicians.

  7. There is an (unintended) irony in the title of this blog post.

    In order to make the author’s points, Trevin Wax mischaracterizes and/or misunderstands most of the “bizarre” beliefs that he cites. Assuming he really and truly believes that he is making a trenchant analysis of the current state of society (rather than just trying to make a few “cute” turns of phrase), he has set up a number of contrasts that have nothing to do with the real world (or exist only in the author’s head):

    To wit:

    6. Who is “applauding” abortions? I have never met anyone who does. And I don’t believe society does.
    7. Who is saying it is “arrogant” to buck the current push to redefine marriage? I have never met anyone saying this, nor do I think society is.
    8. Who is calling people “greedy?” I have never met anyone. Rather, I know people who are having intelligent, respectful conversations about how this country should pay for the “public” good. [ex. How should we provide for a common defense? How should we help people who are unemployed? Who should pay for these things? Why? Etc.]
    9. Who is saying you cannot really “believe” things? You can believe whatever you want. The real question is about how your actions (stemming from your beliefs) affect others. That is where the debate is.
    10. I don’t even understand this one. If you believe every religion shold be “open and inclusive” then of course you would reject the idea that only Jesus is Lord of All. If you believe that only Jesus is Lord of All, you reject the idea that “every religion should be open and inclusive.” — There is no problem here, or even any sort of tension.

    It is my hope that the author is trying to be “cute.” If he is 100% sincere, then I think the title of this blog post still applies, but in a way unintended by the author.

    • Trying a new genre here, Phil.

      “An aphorism is generally understood to be a concise statement containing a subjective truth or observation cleverly and pithily written.”

      These are generalized observations meant to provoke thought and discussion. I don’t expect all to agree with the generalization, or the point.

      • In a similar spirit: :)

        “The quoting of an aphorism, like the angry barking of a dog or the smell of overcooked broccoli, rarely indicates that something helpful is about to happen.”

        –Lemony Snicket, Horseradish: Bitter Truths You Can’t Avoid.

    • Trevin,

      do not be dismayed by the lack of understanding of some of these comment posters. I understand exactly what you mean and give a wholehearted “Yep” to each for its power in exposing the contradictory modern mind. Seriously, our American society needs Christians to awake and extend Christ’s supreme Lordship to all areas of our existence.

      Your article reminds me of Steve Turner’s “Creed”.

      Thanks.

  8. Good stuff!
    Here’s another (especially in reference to your #1)…

    We just spent way too much time trying to develop a system to use Facebook and Twitter without them taking up too much of our time.

  9. Number 8 is pure right-wing political rhetoric, and has nothing of Christ in it. I was disappointed to read it. How’s this for insanity: the same people who insist we are a Christian nation have no interest in taking care of our poor and needy or balancing our national checkbook.

    • Actually, David, private property is an idea we get from God through the Bible. When He says “don’t covet” and “don’t steal”, that would require someone else having something that we don’t have. And you need to check your facts. Conservatives, what you call the right-wing, give far more to charity every year than left-wingers. God does tell us to take care of the poor, but where does He say to just pay your taxes and let the government do it for you? If people who make a lot of money want to give 90% of it to the poor, the government won’t let them. The bible says to give your first fruits to God, but we can’t do that in America because our government takes our taxes out before we even see our paycheck. And the right wing has always stood for less government spending, so your comment about them not wanting to balance the national checkbook is obsurd. They are the only ones talking about cutting spending. Nice try though…

      • Private property, as understood in contemporary economics, is not justified in the Bible. Insofar as we understand “private property” to denote exclusive ownership of the means of production, private property is utterly unjustified in the Biblical texts. Moral imperatives to not covet or steal could ably be construed as arguments against exclusive ownership of the means of production, which allows for the legalization(viz., state based coercive protection) of the theft, i.e. exploitation, of human labor, specifically surplus-value. Indeed, I don’t know of any context in which the commands to not steal or covet refer to private property; the immorality of coveting another’s wife is condemned, but the ownership of women is certainly not based on private property, as they are not a means of production(in the economic sense, biology aside), rather the condemnation of theft or coveting is a condemnation of theft from personal possession(e.g. clothes, houses, potentially spouses(although owning people seems a bit absurd), not private property.

      • The right wing has never been for less government spending. Unless they are not in power.

    • It sounds noble to say, “I don’t want the government to take my money because I want to give it away to poor people myself.” But the ugly attitude that all people on welfare are freeloading drug addicts undeserving of our help is a conservative stereotype, not a Biblical principle. Christ didn’t say, “I was in prison — wrongfully accused, I’m totally innocent — and you visited me. I was hungry — by no fault of my own, and I’m definitely not a drunk — and you fed me.” We in America are pros at defending our right to be selfishness and make it sound like the right thing to do (myself included). Whatever you think of conservative values, my point is merely that this isn’t the place to expound them, and to my mind sign #8 crossed the line between theology and politics.

      • I had no idea there was supposed to be a line between theology and politics. I thought that theology should inform your politics.

        It should be a One Way street though, IMO.

        Mike

      • I agree that theology should inform your politics. That’s my point. I’m just repelled by glib platitudes of any political ideology masquerading as non-negotiable Christian truth.

        • I’m pretty sure his mention of society’s switching of greed for generosity and generosity for greed was theological. It is as valid as the other nine points.

  10. Wow. This is so unlike what I’ve come to expect from the gospel coalition. It’s unlike the positive discourse and edifying material I’ve begun to simply expect from this site. It’s so unlike that actual challenges to our faith and life rather than this seemingly ‘snarky’ and passive aggressive piece.

    And #6 is so strange. It’s not our money to begin with, ‘earned’ or not. It all belongs to God, and he is gracious to let us keep some of it.

    This whole piece is just… strange.

  11. For the most part, the 10 sure signs are thought-provoking, which is probably the intent of author Trevin Wax. Sometimes we need to view complex issues through aphoristic simplicity, just to know where to start to deal with them.
    Sorry to say that I don’t understand the first part of number 3: “We’ve turned the virtue of prudence into the vice of prudishness”. Is there a concrete example? The second part of number 3 is perfectly apt and applicable over a wide spectrum of issues.
    Finally, to Phil: I have seen people applaud abortion decisions, abortion support, statements of abortion rights, etc., and so yes, they are applauding abortion. Not all of us are reasonable or respectful, particularly in those issues where we feel some emotional connection. Quiet, earnest, and real discussions on abortion, like those on race and same-sex marriage, are rare.

    • Yes, I am trying to offer some aphorisms as food for thought. Exceptions to generalizations usually prove the point of the generalization. :)

    • “We’ve turned the virtue of prudence into the vice of prudishness.”

      Think modern Christian fundamentalism.

      If you’re a man with long hair, you’re not right with God.
      If you’re a woman with a skirt hem above the knee, you’re not right with God.
      If you wear jeans to church, you’re not right with God.

      On the other hand,…
      “…and the vice of impropriety into the virtue of authenticity.”

      Think over-contextualization.

      I can’t preach to the druggies unless I have street cred as being a druggie.
      I can’t witness to college kids unless I throw in an expletive occasionally to give myself some street cred.
      ..etc.

      It’s the old pendulum swing.

  12. [...] Trevin Wax: [...]

  13. This is horrible.
    4. We ban soda from schools but make condoms widely available… because corn syrup is a more serious matter for youngsters than sex.

    Really?

  14. [...] Taken from http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/trevinwax/2013/02/19/10-sure-signs-weve-lost-our-minds/ [...]

  15. Society, like people have large cracks of inconsistency running through them. The preacher in Ecclesiastes does a similar thing to this post in resonating with the down side of life, corruption appears to be the big winner & while many strain out gnats point for point, no one seems to care, nothing seems to change & many people have lost connection with God & his ways.

    I see evidence of sanity & the insane & on the whole agree that society reflects the goodness of God & the fallen state of humanity. Unbelief says we can do it all by ourselves, thank you very much all the same, God.

    The ending in Ecclesiastes however challenges our feelings & notions of what we imagine we can & can’t do or what we imagine we can get away with as we take it to the limit. For now a spiritual battle ensues & Trevin’s post reflects much of that.

    I wouldn’t do away with this post; maybe rework it for another day, or something similar. I see plenty of things that society applauds (in a manner of speaking) displaying approval, also the intolerance of humanistic tolerance.

  16. These are so true Trevin. Thanks for posting. Kind of distubing isn’t it?

    And to the disappointed….um….these are generalizations…some of you kind of need to get over yourselves. The truth is that our society has lost it’s mind. I don’t know why you’re so disappointed with this post. People, we will never work for change if we don’t think that anything is wrong. Helping people feel better about their efforts instead of showing them their desparate need for a Saviour is nothing more then Christless expounding on nothing. And if you think that “good feeling” articles are all that TGC is about, you haven’t read much here. Sin has ruined everything. The Gospel is very affective inn showing us that. If you haven’t gotten that already, you don’t understand the gospel very well. Trevin’s not trying to be cute, it’s just that you’re offended by what’s true about these statements…as you should be. But if you want hope in this “lost its mind” society, take hope in the power of the Gospel to restore and renew.

    And Phil…I wish I lived in your utopia the problem is that this place you speak of doesn’t exist and apparently your circle of friends and aquaintances are very small and apparently level headed. Congratulations, you’re aquainted with .0000098% of western society. Must be nice. For the rest of us, the truth of the condition of our society is troubling and vividly real every day we wake up and enter it. We don’t wake up every morning praying that God end (interject your favorite social ill here)…rather we pray that He will be praised among the nations and that He will have mercy on many more and draw them to repentance. The people of Romans 1 lost their minds and so has our society. We call what is good, evil and what is evil, good….Or worse yet, we grade sin by how much it offends us instead of how all sin is a damning offence against a holy God….the 10 points here demonstrate this appropriately.

    • I wanted voice my agreement with those who called the author on the misplaced conservative ideology and the plain weird (banning sodas versus condoms).

      The ‘our society has lost its mind thing’ is tired alarmism. Two hundred years ago American society brutally enslaved African Americans. Did it still have ‘its mind’ then? One hundred years ago, American society did not allow women to vote and exploited child labor in textile factories (and still does). The foundation of a post like this is that America was a Christian nation that has lost its way. You should be very careful making alarmist arguments like that.

      • Perhaps you do not get the “plain weird” one about condoms and sodas. It is sarcasm. Soft drinks are being banned from schools for the purported reason of protecting kids from a danger of obesity. On the other hand, condoms are being given out in schools, encouraging dangerous and immoral behavior as well as misinformation about their effectiveness. It is misplaced priorities.

        It’s like trading dimes for nickels because they are bigger. The importance is not their size, but their value.

  17. My initial enthusiasm for the Gospel Coalition was once again tempered by disappointment when I read number 8, which is just a right wing political statement masquerading as biblical truth by virtue of the points that surround it. This is, unfortunately, becoming more and more common on these blogs.

  18. Trevin,
    Judging by the reaction, I’d say you’re on to something. I imagine Chesterton received a few letters of critique himself. I suppose I’m surprised (mostly disappointed)at the responses where it’s seems obvious there’s been a severe erosion of the view of private property, sanctity of life, and religious liberty. I’m equally surpised at the responses regarding these where some say they “don’t undertand” or that number such and such makes no sense. It would appear critical thinking is dead.

    • yes, because these ten points–divorced from any kind of context, lacking explicit biblical (or otherwise) support, and unreliant on any kind of argumentation–are the example par excellence of critical thinking.

    • Brian,

      It’s hard to find a more meaningful compliment to me than being compared, even loosely, to Chesterton – the master of quotable nuggets of truth.

      • I guess one man’s “nugget of truth” is another man’s partisan claptrap.

        (And, as an aside, Nugget Number 10 is simply nonsensical.)

  19. Just so you all know, number 8 is actually spot on.

  20. 1. We worry about the shallowness and superficiality of online relationships, so we go to FaceBook and Twitter to register our concerns.

    Some do and some don’t. When you make a tool available to everyone, some people are bound to do stupid things with them.

    2. We are so focused on the newest and latest things that we leave behind the oldest and most foundational things.

    OTOH, older is not necessarily better. Sometimes new things are truthful things that were hidden.

    3. We’ve turned the virtue of prudence into the vice of prudishness and the vice of impropriety into the virtue of authenticity.

    Can’t argue with this one.

    4. We ban soda from schools but make condoms widely available… because corn syrup is a more serious matter for youngsters than sex.

    Yes, but teenage pregnancy is worse than sex. Abstinance only doesn’t work for everyone. Better to have a teenager not ruin their dreams because of a mistake of passion on prom night.

    5. We decry the exploitation of women, but cry “censorship” when someone wants decency standards against objectifying women on television.

    Cries of exploitation are usually made by third parties, not the women themselves who others perceive are being exploited.

    6. We chide a pregnant mother for smoking because of the harm it does to her child, but we applaud her choice to walk into a clinic and have her baby torn limb by limb and extracted from her uterus.

    If evangelicals would stop equating abortificients with third trimester abortions, it would go a long way to healing the rift. Besides, there’s no law that prohibits a pregnant woman from smoking, but many Christians do want to pass a law that would force a woman to carry a child to term.

    7. It’s arrogant to buck the current push to redefine marriage, but not arrogant to buck the consensus of virtually every society before us.

    So what? Slavery was practiced almost uniformly throughout the world prior to the 16th century. Times change and civilization advances.

    8. Citizens who would like to keep the money they earn are “greedy.” Politicians who would take their wealth and give it away are “generous.”

    Crass political simplification. Nothing need be said about this one.

    9. We believe in tolerance: everyone can believe whatever they want (as long as they don’t really believe it).

    No one cares what Christians or Scientologists believe. People might mock you, but tough. When your beliefs begin to affect social policy and the rights of others to disregard your beliefs though, we have a problem.

    10. We believe every religion should be open and inclusive, but not open and inclusive enough for a Jesus who claims to be Lord of all.

    There’s no evidence that the exclusivism of orthodox Christianity is any more true than Buddhism. Jesus may or may not have claimed what you say, but that doesn’t make it true.

    • This is simply ridiculous.

      • Agreed.

      • Thanks for that I astute counter-argument.

        • Pearls before swine. Would you even listen? Seems as if you’re too far gone for a back and forth internet text conversation to have any sway on your dogma.

          But, just to show that I care about you knowing why I object, on the last one, Trevin was not speaking of the truth of Jesus’ claims but on society’s intolerance of people who believe Jesus’ claims. Your argument about Buddhism is irrelevant.

          • Brent,

            Can you show me how number 10 makes any sense at all? If a societal “value” is “we believe every religion should be open and inclusive” then the society is NOT going to “value” a religion that rejects “openness and inclusiveness.” How is this even a tension, or any sort of “inconsistency”?

            I–literally–don’t understand.

          • Phil,

            I think the word “inclusive” in the first part means that a religion should not exclude anyone from taking part in it if they choose to (no discrimination). The second “inclusive” is in the context that Christianity automatically includes everyone since Jesus is Lord of all (including those who do not want to be considered under his Lordship).

            In other words, society wants access to church, but they don’t want the church’s doctrines to have access to them.

            That’s the way I interpret number 10.

          • In other words, society wants access to church, but they don’t want the church’s doctrines to have access to them.

            If all Trevin Wax is trying to say in number 10 is:

            Society wants an open and inclusive Christianity (think: accepting of gays), but in doing so they have to reject the tenets of “real” Christianity,

            then I agree that Number 10 makes sense. (That is, Number 10 is logically coherent.)

            I don’t think that is what he is trying to say, though. (At least his claim seems to revolve (somehow) around society and its desire “for every religion”–not just society and its relationship to Christianity.)

          • Phil,

            To understand the meaning of number 10, I would suggest watching the South Park episode “The Death Camp of Tolerance”.

            “INTOLERANCE WILL NOT BE TOLERATED!!!”

          • I am not going to be able to watch the episode. Can you explain what you mean?

            In this regard, I don’t see what’s wrong with the statement:

            “Certain attitudes and understandings will be frowned upon here.”

            But “Intolerance will not be tolerated” is pretty funny.

          • Phil,

            Basically, I think you get what I perceive the meaning of number 10 to be from your second comment. And after rereading #10, it is someone vague and hard to understand, and I assumed the meaning when skimming over it.

            To explain the comment and the premise of the episode:

            The inconsistency of people who believe that everyone should be “open and inclusive” or tolerant is that they themselves are exclusive and intolerant when they condemn those who are exclusive and/or intolerant. So to hold up their own values, they must be inclusive to those who are exclusive.

  21. On target Trevan. Thanks for a pithy and pungent synopsis of the our cultural lunacy.

  22. Regarding “No one cares what Christians or Scientologists believe. People might mock you, but tough.” If there’s one thing Christians know, it’s mocking and persecution. We’re a bit used to it.

  23. I would add a #11

    We teach kids in science class that it’s natural for the strong to exploit the weak and then in health class tell them bullying is immoral.

  24. We are an hypocrisy democracy.

  25. [...] 10 Sure Signs We’ve Lost Our Minds [...]

  26. As a Christian who is not an economic conservative (and not interested in pushing conservative social morality on the public via legislation), and a relatively new reader to this site, I’m really happy to see comments disagreeing with the trite tone of this post and especially the content of #8. If it hadn’t been for the comments pushing back, this would have probably been the last thing I read from the Gospel Coalition.

  27. I hope you all realize that Marxism is Christian heresy. The idea of taking from the “wealthy” and redistributing to the “poor” is not Christian at all.

    • With all due respect, attacking the ugly strawman you’ve made of those you disagree with doesn’t exactly forward the cause of Christ, either.

      • What strawman? A Marxist idea is still a Marxist idea whether the proponent knows it or not. Awareness of a label is not a prerequisite for existence of a label.

        Maybe I’m misunderstanding your objection.

        • Correct. You don’t understand. But to use your own words, “Seems as if you’re too far gone for a back and forth internet text conversation to have any sway on your dogma.” Have a good one!

          • Perhaps you could explain to me how the concept of forcing the “rich” to pay more and giving it to the “poor” is a Christian concept. I am certainly willing to listen.

            You seemed to dismiss that element of Trevin’s blog as “right-wing” propaganda, but never gave an explanation. If he had made a comment in support of taxing the rich to give to the poor, would you have equally labeled it as left-wing propaganda?

  28. [...] Reblogged from The Gospel Coalition [...]

  29. So, in summation, “New and modern things suck. Old, antiquated things are awesome.”

    You know what other forms of “consensus” held by old civilizations we’ve “bucked”? How about bloodletting, slavery and child labor? Wouldn’t’ it be peachy if we could do away with modern medicine, women’s equality, science, and public education, too?

    PS: “Consensus” is socialism, you dirty hippie.

    • That’s not what he’s saying at all. He’s calling out our modern tendency to commit the fallacy of “appealing to novelty”. That is, believing that simply because an idea is new it is better.

      Of course it goes without saying that an “appeal to antiquity” is also fallacious. The point is, all statements like “you believe something written in that dusty 2000 year old book?” are wrong-headed. There’s no expiration date on truth.

  30. [...] Trevin Wax has 10 sure signs we’ve lost our mind. My favorites were: [...]

  31. [...] mai departe AICI Rate this:Poţi trimite mai departe asta:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterDiggGoogle [...]

  32. [...] 10 Sure Signs We Have Lost Our Minds – Trevin Wax highlights some trendy logical absurdities in western culture. [...]

  33. Trevin,

    Judging by the comments, #8 hits home for too many people.

    I think it would be good to write an article explaining the point of it. Talking about how moral ends do not justify immoral means and that utilitarianism is at odds with the bible.

    • With regard to #8, I think the problem people have with it is not that it “hits home,” (although I am not exactly sure what you mean by that) rather the point is that it “misses the mark” or is “flat out wrong.”

      Simply because people are upset or disagree with something doesn’t mean “you must be on to something” (as Brian above states–and if that’s what you mean). By that reasoning, Westboro Baptist Church is really, really on to something, as a whole lot of people disagree with them.

      I am also not sure what “immoral means” you are referring to. Taxation in general?

      • My point is that it does not miss the mark and is not flat out wrong.

        Romans 13 says the state is to “bear the sword” as an “an averger”. Not as a healer, a feeder, a contractor, an educator, etc. So if the state bears the sword, whether in taxation or anything else, for other purposes than as an avenger, it needs some other biblical justification than its role as the state. I am unaware of any other bible passage that justifies a person using violence to achieve their ends, no matter how noble those ends. Therefore, I am convinced that taxation for such purposes in no different than theft. And the state and those who operate it are committing the same acts as a common thief.

        • Am I understanding you correctly? That the only thing the state can do is prosecute criminals?

          If I am understanding you correctly, I don’t think you are going to see an article from Mr. Wax about that any time soon.

          • Phil,

            Yes, that is pretty much my view. Although I would say prosecuting criminals can include waging war against other states that are criminal.

            And touche. I doubt Mr. Wax shares these views.

            Maybe he could write about the notion that somehow business people are inherently greedy while politicians are “public servants” out for the “common good”. As a whole, politicians are the greediest group of people in society.

          • As a whole, politicians are the greediest group of people in society.

            I don’t see why. I can see why someone might say “the most power hungry,” but not for “the greediest.”

          • They use the power and coercion of the state to force out and prevent competition so established companies that they have an interest in can charge monopoly prices and make exorbitant profits not possible in a free market.

            The bailouts of the financial services industry are a prime example.

  34. [...] Trevin Wax: 10 Sure Signs We’ve Love Our Minds  [...]

  35. [...] ~ 10 sure signs we’ve lost our minds [...]

  36. [...] is a great article from Trevin Wax that will make you wonder if you have lost your mind. Check it out! Share [...]

  37. [...] “Ten Sure Signs We’ve Lost Our Minds” (Trevin Wax) [...]

  38. [...] Read the whole list here. [...]

  39. [...] 10 Sure Signs We’ve Lost Our Minds [...]

  40. [...] Wax at The Gospel Coalition highlights ten sure signs we’ve lost our minds — ten stark inconsistencies held in contemporary discourse. “1. We worry about the [...]

  41. You forgot one.

    11: Exalting pets over human life.

    Having several children myself, with the last being a girl, and I get constantly told (sometimes strangers) “well now you got your girl.” It’s almost implied that “…now you can stop”. That may sound extreme but having “a lot” of children is almost demonized. Two kids, that’s fine. Three, that’s ok. Four kids, pushing limits. Five kids, don’t you know there’s birth control? Six+, are you the Duggars? I’ve had these kinds of conversations with others about children that elude children are: a hindrance, taking away joy, they ruin marriages, more of a curse than a blessing. We forget that the Bible tells us and I agree that children truly ARE a blessing from God. Every child we’ve had in our family has always added to the joy and blessing of our house

    Put this trend together with the trend to personify pets. Many Dogs/cats now get outfits, accessories, are catered to a spoken of better than human beings. They are referred to as “our babies”, often times eat better than I do! They sleep on plush beds taht third world country children would be envious of. I have seen people pushing their pooches around in baby strollers and taking them around town like they’re people. I could say more about all of this but you get the idea.

    This is insanity. Children are a blessing from God. Every human being is made in the image of God and His likeness and may be part of His Redeemed. I hate to say it but what the Bible says about pets is that they are to be subdued (Gen 1:26). This does not mean mistreated! But they do not share the equal privilege that humans do. They shouldn’t be treated like people. Our greatest privilege and relationships are to God and to other human beings. Jesus didn’t come to die for the sins of animals.

    I love dogs and other animals, perhaps more than most people posting here. But they need to have a rightful place and thats not equal to or above other humans. My greater responsibility as a Christian is to my neighbor or to the poor. It’s hard for me to understand how dog food is a $10 billion a year industry (USA) yet there are homeless here that go hungry.

Post a Comment

Your email is never shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*