The Gospel Coalition


A Guest Post by Eric C. Redmond

Eric C. Redmond is the author of Where Are All the Brothers? Straight Answers to Men's Questions About the Church (Crossway, 2008). He most recently served as the 2007-2008 Second Vice-President of the Southern Baptist Convention. He has previously posted other thoughts on the election at his blog, A Man from Issachar. He and his wife, Pamela, are adoptive parents who have five children in their home and two children in heaven.


Let us then continue to honor the good appointment of God, which may be easily done, provided we impute to ourselves whatever evil may accompany it. Hence he teaches us here the end for which magistrates are instituted by the Lord; the happy effects of which would always appear, were not so noble and salutary an institution marred through our fault. At the same time, princes do never so far abuse their power, by harassing the good and innocent, that they do not retain in their tyranny some kind of just government: there can then be no tyranny which does not in some respects assist in consolidating the society of men.
John Calvin, commentary on Romans 13:3.


A Note of Thanks

First, allow me to express my thanks to Justin for inviting me to contribute to his blog on the day after what might go down in history as the most significant Presidential election in the United States in our lifetime. I have found Justin to be a kind and discerning brother, for whom I give many thanks. I also am grateful for his passion for demonstrating the mercy of Christ to the unborn and the orphan—a passion we share in experience.

My Post-Obama-Election Dilemma

I am not and never have been a fan of John McCain, his proposed policies, his inconsistent record on many issues, his poor choice for a running mate, his thoughtless economic plan, or of his very negative campaigning against Barak Obama. It was hard for me to bear the thought of voting for him. It was equally hard for me to bear the thought of siding with a campaign for "change" that would passively allow each state to choose whether it would change the definition and legal institution of marriage, and that would not actively seek to change (read "work for the overturning of") Roe. v. Wade. For me, neither candidate represented change or progress for the country, except on the issue of the country's readiness to be led by a candidate of color.
How I wish that the first time there was a probable opportunity for an African American candidate to reach the White House I could have cast my vote for such a candidate without any reservation. However, I am pro-life, and President-Elect Obama is the most anti-life senator to come to power in my lifetime. I also am pro-conservative justices (who limit legislating from the bench). I am pro-marriage— that is, pro-heterosexual marriage. In the end, I could not overlook these issues as I approached Election Day. But the temptation to justify voting for Obama was strong, for I did not want to be against the side of history—of an African American finally making it to the Oval Office.

However, if I have not learned anything else from the recent happenings at my (soon to be former) church, it is these two things: First, it is not virtuous to side with the majority because one does not wish to stand out among friends, or because one is unwilling to examine all information on an issue, or because one wants to dispense dislikes toward current leadership, in spite of righteous reasons to vote against the majority—in fact, under some circumstances, it can be a horrendous evil. Second, even if one is seeking to be consistent in humility and holiness individually, to abstain from voting on any matter is to allow the majority to speak for you. That same majority, with a victory, might make trouble for the greater populous by means of the evil(s) of which you sought to distance yourself by abstaining from voting.

So I made two very difficult choices: First, I chose to vote rather than stay home. Second, I voted for lives of the unborn rather than for approval from the vast majority of my own ethnic community. The latter choice took the risk of being reproached for the name of Christ, for I only voted for life because of the fear of my Lord (cf. Ex. 1:15-2:12). I know such a choice risks invoking the ire or dismissal of the overwhelming majority of the African American community. Yet, on a most historic Election Day, I could not allow my personal pro-life stance to crumble under the weight of being perceived as a traitor to the African American cause for victory, for that goes against all godly wisdom:
If you faint in the day of adversity,
your strength is small.
Rescue those who are being taken away to death;
hold back those who are stumbling to the slaughter.
If you say, “Behold, we did not know this,”
does not he who weighs the heart perceive it?
Does not he who keeps watch over your soul know it,
and will he not repay man according to his work?
Prov. 24:10-12, ESV


I cast my vote in the hopes of rescuing those being taken to the slaughter. I could not vote in such a way that I would have ignored the blood flowing from fertility clinics, for I know that the Almighty would repay my cowardice. My hope in his word is that he will remember me and graciously and provide for my life, repaying me with mercy.

In contrast, I do not think a recession can be said to be taking people to death unjustly, especially when many in Maryland voted to throw their lots in with bringing slots to my state; (the correlation of the recession to the slots-vote should be obvious to the righteous). I think our soldiers voluntarily sign up to defend our freedom at the risk of their own lives. Lack of health insurance coverage for all makes life very hard for many, but it does not lead to a denial of all medical care for any one class of people. (N.B. I have two members in my home with medical pre-conditions, and I am about to begin paying health insurance out of pocket because we cannot afford a break in coverage when my current job ends. I understand the value of health insurance and the stress of keeping up with the rising costs of such coverage.) So the economy, the war in Iraq, and universal health insurance became secondary issues for me—albeit very important ones —because righteousness was not at stake. Even so, the righteous should not now overlook these issues while loving their fellow man.

My Duty to Christ and the King

The question for me at this time is this: Can I continue to live Soli Deo Gloria under a President whose moral judgment already is questionable before he takes the oath of office? Yes I can, for I can be obedient to Scripture, praying for the one in authority (I Tim. 2:1-8), honoring the one in authority (1 Pet. 2:13-18), submitting to the one in authority (Rom. 13:1-7; Tit. 3:1), and seeking righteousness for the entire citizenry (Prov. 14:34). These I will seek to do by grace. I will "honor the good appointment of God."

Moreover, I can follow the admonition and example of Calvin, who, in the quote above, preached that believers should impute to themselves the ills of government and recognize the common grace given to mankind through human governing authorities. For example, in our day, it is not the governmental regulation that slaughters the innocent; it is the people who chose to end the lives of their children, and the willing executioners who kill for the sake of the monetary gain afforded by the abortion industry. The government only allows this sin to receive legal permission and protection. Nevertheless, that same government provides many laws that allow me to worship in freedom, preach the Gospel freely, vote in an election, and write blog posts like this one without fear of censorship or death. I readily can recognize the retention of "some kind of just government" under President Obama's rule.

My Dilemma Resolved
My humble proposal of an attempt to be Christocentric rather than Afrocentric will not be received with approval by many African Americans that I know. I hope to live long enough to witness another African American become a candidate for President of the United States of America—a candidate who is pro-life and pro-righteousness. Yet my hope may ring hollow to many other African Americans who are celebrating a Democratic victory that happens to seem pro-African American. To the celebrants, I might be labeled as sore loser seeking to justify his reasons for siding with conservative white America rather than with Black America.
In writing elsewhere about "how I have wrestled through the Christian version of the Uncle Tom epithet" (with respect to my embracing of Reformed Theology), I have penned this thought:


If a person would allow himself to be pigeonholed into becoming a person of a nationalistic or ethno-centric thought out of the fear of being viewed as an Oreo or Uncle Tom, then Reformed Theology is not for that person. But neither is the Gospel, for the Gospel calls each of us to stand against an ethnic-centered philosophy of one's own race, for such a philosophy is naturally conformed to this present world and is in need of redemption. If you cannot stand against your own culture where it does not square with the Scriptures, you are the one who is ashamed of Christ, and such shame has nothing to with philosophical or ontological Blackness; it only has to do with your view of the majesty of the God who calls you to deny yourself in order to follow Christ. ("Sovereign in a Sweet Home, Schooling, and Solace," in Glory Road: Our Journey Into Reformed Christianity, ed. Anthony Carter [Wheaton, IL: Crossway, Wheaton, forthcoming])


I am fairly certain that if J. C. Watts had been the Republican nominee for President, and if he had been running against Hillary Clinton as the Democratic nominee, the great majority of African Americans would have found reason to vote for the wife of the "first Black President" and her liberal ideals rather than for Watts and his conservative ideals. In doing so, such a vote would indicate that the great majority of African Americans have feelings about the type of African American who would be deemed worthy their votes for the seat at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue—who would be worthy of African Americans' approval as their choice for their representative in the White House. Seemingly, for the Black Nationalist and the liberal, not every African American would qualify to wear an honor for which our ancestors were stolen, enslaved, whipped, lynched, dehumanized, and killed. Likewise, it is my opinion that my ancestors experienced such suffering and injustices so that it would be possible for any African American to reach the Oval Office, but not so that every African American, regardless of qualifications, could reach the Oval Office. Those who fought for civil rights for African Americans were doing so out of a moral impetus to see African Americans treated humanely—as human beings rather than like chattel or as 3/5ths-human. I think the best way to honor their work and lives when the office of Commander in Chief is within reach would be to continue that moral quest. That quest is continued by finding a candidate who seeks to see African Americans, even those in the womb, treated humanely—as people rather than as cattle for our labor and experimentation or as a 3/5th-human fetus.




Comments:

Rex Ray

November 7, 2008 at 12:43 AM

Thanks for speaking your good thoughts.

The Glasers

November 7, 2008 at 08:50 AM

Thank you for your wise and gracious food for thought. I was not thrilled about the choice in candidates either. I could easily vote for a fiscally and socially conservative African American without hesitation!

I feel reassured that not all African Americans view a vote for life as being racist. We homeschool, and we try to face troubling aspects of our country's history by reading how your Christian brothers faced racism: Amos Fortune, Booker T. Washington, and George Washington Carver. Last year, we stopped at the Tuskegee Airmen Museum and the Tuskegee Institute on a trip to Louisiana. I know in my heart that my children and I try to respect people for who they are. But, it hurts to think some view the vote I cast last Tuesday as bigotry.

CR

November 7, 2008 at 01:22 AM

cwils2007 said: some ignorant s!@#$

I did't know profanity was allowed on B2W?

E.

November 6, 2008 at 12:59 PM

An inspired, well-put article, Eric. I appreciate your unique perspective and honest reflection. And as someone else already commented, I wish you had been able to share these thoughts with many before the election.

cwils2007

November 6, 2008 at 12:46 AM

some ignorant shit

ron

November 6, 2008 at 12:40 PM

"I believe that the issues the author put on the back burner are far more important to the safety and well being of ALL Americans"

This confuses me beyond reason. In your view the unborn apparently are not worthy of being afforded safety and well being, otherwise you would not relegate it behind the other issues. I can only assume you have concluded life begins outside the womb, which changes the whole argument.

Timur

November 6, 2008 at 12:03 PM

Well then you agree. So going back to the original message in the blog... Why vote for a candidate based on a couple of issues that conflict with biblical thought? The author wrote this:

"So the economy, the war in Iraq, and universal health insurance became secondary issues for me—albeit very important ones —because righteousness was not at stake."

I believe that the issues the author put on the back burner are far more important to the safety and well being of ALL Americans, not just Christian Americans. The United States government does and should, represent everyone.

ron

November 6, 2008 at 11:46 AM

"Let's not be so naive to think that God really cares what the government is doing."

That is a mighty bold, and I suggest very wrong statement. I believe he cares about all things. We are to pray for our leaders because they matter. Otherwise why the call from scripture to pray for them? To a nations peril God has at times given the people what they want, and it is recorded that terrible things have come through the leaders they so desparately craved.

That being said, I agree that the best agent of change is the church living out its commision through the actions of its people.

Kez

November 6, 2008 at 11:33 AM

I am not African-American, so perhaps I cannot fully understand the issue. I have voted for African-Americans in the past and thought nothing of it, quite frankly. I have voted my conscience, not color, as hopefully did all. The office of presidency requires a much broader resume than the color of your skin, so I don't understand how this is an issue at all. Don't get me wrong, I understand it from the perspective of history in the making, but why should we, in this day and age, be surprised that a man of color could, or would, be voted in as president?

That being said, I agree that our responsibility as Christians now is to accept the one whom God sovereignly placed in leadership over us and submit to our governing authorities, so long as that submission does not go against the scriptures. Pray for them, for God uses them both for blessing and cursing. Most importantly as we go out on our way, we must live as Christians, love our neighbors, and meet them where they are without compromising our witness, disciple those whom God puts in our path to disciple, and say yes to our Lord daily, so that we can say yes to Him even in the midst of persecution. Our job description does not change no matter who is in office. Our hope is not in government, for as you so eloquently stated, government can not do the job that we, as bond-servants of our Lord Jesus, are supposed to be doing every day. The only way the culture will change is through the miracle of rebirth. We are supposed to be the guiding influence in culture and we have fallen "asleep in the light" (Keith Green) and allowed culture to infiltrate the church.

Timur

November 6, 2008 at 11:02 AM

Hi ron thanks for your response. When the government kills someone in the name of justice, they have sanctioned it. I think it is dangerous to play the politics/religion game. Afterall by most standards Jesus was a total radical. If we start tampering with things we might as go all the way. I hardly think many Christians today would be satisfied living under a system of politics consistently driven by Jesus' true intentions. Give to Caesar's what it Caesar's. Let's not be so naive to think that God really cares what the government is doing. Much more importantly, what is the CHURCH doing?

Mike

November 6, 2008 at 11:00 PM

Great post! It is a little disconcerting though that if I my white friends thought I was a sellout if I voted for Obama because he is of a different ethnicity I would consider them racist. How come no one is calling out the African Americans who are calling other African Americans sellouts who did not vote for Obama?

(BTW I actually voted for Bob Barr)

CPCC Pastor

November 6, 2008 at 10:53 AM

The article is interesting, worth reading twice even. But judging from the wide ranging comments posted in response, you, Justin, have a lot of work to do in promoting clear thinking, and rational argumentation. Well, at least keep doing your best with this influential role the Lord has entrusted to you. (I suggest we all keep praying for Justin and those with the ear of such a large community).

ron

November 6, 2008 at 10:47 AM

Burke is correct. The economy consistently is what directs votes.

Timur, keep in mind that many people are concerned about justice for the poor and downtrodden, and dislike what many in the the evangelical church have become. Hypocrisy has raged throughout the ages.

I too get disappointed. But, that does not changes the nature of abortion and the fact it is a legally protected evil. You may argue about war, capital punishment, justice for the poor and care for those in oppressed lands, which are valid serious topics, but do not make the mistake of leveling them with abortion.

Abortion is an objective evil, and when the government santions it, it is sanctioning evil. Whereas war, social justice and the like are fluid and debatable - all of which suffer from the sinful nature of man and may be approached with evil intent, or may be done with grave concern for the most innocent. That cannot be done with abortion.

Timur

November 6, 2008 at 09:43 AM

I don't agree. Where are the Christians when countless innocent lives are taken around the world in the name of democracy? Where are the Christians when people are put to death in our own courts (love your enemy?) Why are they building multi million dollar mega churches when they can't spare a $5 meal for someone living down the street. I am a believer myself and voted for Obama because I think there are much more important issues facing our faith than gay marriage (which he is not in favor of) and abortion rights. I think we live in an age of Christian hypocrisy and don't for a minute think that non-believers are not noticing. I pray that Tuesday's landslide election will force us to go back to basics and distance ourselves from faith damaging conservatism. Read His words carefully and with an open mind. Not through a filter of right wing politics.

Burke

November 6, 2008 at 09:31 AM

This has unquestionably been an historic moment for people of African origin. I am moved to tears when I think about the struggles for racial equality that have been fought throughout America's past.

However, a large part of me is disappointed to think that America, a self-proclaimed Christian nation, puts a greater importance on its own selfish wealth or the color of a man's skin rather than on life itself.

But race was not the big issue in this campaign. It was the economy.
Abortion, marriage, and homosexuality were issues as well, but they, too, took a back seat to economy.

America has been so blessed by God but has failed to recognize that it is of His hand. The current generation of Americans has never known poverty or need. No, they know of nothing but wealth.

The thought of higher taxes to pay for education or government or roads causes us to scream because someone is spending "our" money, however, we don't think twice about the luxuries that we can (or can't) afford.

Privileges have become rights in American minds.

The Bible discusses money more than any other subject (over 2,400 times). Soon, the time will come when we will be judged for our love of money over our love of mankind. I pray that we can live for Christ rather than for money or for ourselves.

ron

November 6, 2008 at 08:54 AM

Surprisedbyjoy,

I understand there are self-righteous people who vote pro-life and are nothing but noise makers, and display anything but love and compassion for others. I also understand the victory will be won by reaching the hearts and minds of inividuals through words and deed. The government has no power in that action.

That being said, it does not change the error of moral equivocation. What I read is peple whitewashing the issue of abortion, and justifying their support of Obama by false comparisons. I do believe abortion is the greatest evil being perpetrated in this land under legal protection. I do not see how anyone could think otherwise. This does not mean there aren't other horrible evils, but they are not sanctioned by the government.

So, as I will pray for President Obama, I also pray that we are not such a deluded people to think that improvements in our economy or foreign affairs trump Mr. Obama's opinion on abortion. This is a man who says he is not qualified to know when life begins, yet says go ahead and abort if you believe it best for yourself. Amazing! The lack reason in that statement is frightening, and give me wonder as to what other unreasonable thoughts he holds.

Yet, he is now our president, and I will give him the respect he so callously refuses to give the unborn.

Tasha

November 6, 2008 at 07:06 PM

THIS IS FOR THE PEOPLE WHO HAVE LEFT COMMENTS ON HERE ABOUT BEING A CHRISTIAN AND VOTING FOR OBAMA.I JUST HAVE TO ASK HOW IN THE WORLD YOU CAN CALL YOURSELF A CHRISTIAN AND THEN SUPPORT SOMEONE THAT IS IN FAVOR OF SUCH EVIL ACTIONS.IF YOU ARE A CHRISTIAN IT ISN'T ABOUT SUPPORTING A PERSON WHO IS THE SAME RACE AS YOU OR WHO YOU THINK IS GOING TO MAKE US ALL MORE PROSPEROUS.IT IS ABOUT STANDING UP FOR WHAT IS RIGHT!

ron

November 6, 2008 at 06:14 PM

"Ask any of the church members that I worship with to give up their guns and their homes in their upper class surburban communities and see what happens. I don't quite understand why so many from the Christian Right are hung up on the abortion/same-sex marriage debate when they are not pushing for democratic socialism and peace."

Remember, the argument over abortion is not about what conservative rich, gun loving suburanites do, nor is it about what *peace* shouting liberal socialistists do. It's about what our culture holds in greatest value, and when the value holds a woman's choice to abort is above the life the unborn, the culture is has chosen death over life.

Do not let your frustration with the failings of certain groups hinder your ability to see the horror of abortion.

Peace.

Stan McCullars

November 6, 2008 at 06:07 PM

The VanValkenburgs,
You stated: I would never personally but I would never assume the right to take that choice away from someone else.

Does that include owning slaves? How about adults having sex with small children? Or does that only work with dismembering babies?

Nick Light

November 6, 2008 at 06:04 PM

Eric:

You are an awesome Christian!!! Thanks for your insight, and sharing your struggles with your own community. You are a brave man that is not afraid of peer pressure. I am personally ashamed of all the haters who are commenting on this post. Even if I didn't agree with you I would still show you the same respect. It should be the same for everyone. This post was greatly encouraging to me personally, thanks for the encouragement!!! Under our new president, we should not show disrespect, anger and malice. Even if we disagree with him. That does not mean we should accept what he believes but we should follow what God says about respecting leaders. Even Paul stated that the early Christians should still have respect for Nero, even though he was the one throwing them to the lions. God is ultimately in control of our country, and our country's leaders. Jesus is the only truly reliable leader. We should trust in him.

John C

November 6, 2008 at 04:58 AM

This is some great thinking and a very resepctful post. I especially like

"For example, in our day, it is not the governmental regulation that slaughters the innocent; it is the people who chose to end the lives of their children, and the willing executioners who kill for the sake of the monetary gain afforded by the abortion industry. The government only allows this sin to receive legal permission and protection. Nevertheless, that same government provides many laws that allow me to worship in freedom, preach the Gospel freely, vote in an election, and write blog posts like this one without fear of censorship or death. I readily can recognize the retention of "some kind of just government" under President Obama's rule.

HOWEVER: Why does everyone seem to feel as if Barak is going to be so stuck in his ways? Why do we not have optimism and pray for him and those around him to have influence in his life where he might eventually change his position and thoughts on abortion? God can do amazing things, and still may be working on our new president. Why do we write him off before he's even taken office? He's young, he's intelligent - I see this as the perfect opportunity for him to have an epiphany and revelation towards honoring unborn life. Let's pray for that and not be so "we have to put up with him" kind of attitude. Like I said, God may have him in the perfect position he wants him (and our country) in for amazing reasons we can't even begin to fathom. Think about it?

Timur

November 6, 2008 at 04:40 PM

Ron-

Thanks for the lengthy response. There is obviously a lot to ponder there, and I most certainly will. However, assuming one wants to blur the line between religion and politics, no one on this blog has still adequately explained the current hypocrisy that exists in our government. There is strong evidence in the Bible that Jesus was in favor of social and pascifist principles. Ask any of the church members that I worship with to give up their guns and their homes in their upper class surburban communities and see what happens. I don't quite understand why so many from the Christian Right are hung up on the abortion/same-sex marriage debate when they are not pushing for democratic socialism and peace.

we are a family of six...

November 6, 2008 at 04:00 PM

I think what you said was very encouraging. I find no offense in my heart, just encouragement to stand up for what I believe in. Even if it's not the majority.

ron

November 6, 2008 at 03:47 PM

Timur, just a last thought for you.

You sound like an interesting and engaged person. Your arguments ring as someone either in college or freshly removed. If I am correct be careful about your decision processes. I have seen to many good minds confused by enlightened theories advanced through higher education.

You are concerned that we should not legislate Christian ways into Western politics. You must realize that in a sense all items are legislated in a realm of faith. When an idea is advanced it holds to some value system, which you must acknowledge is based on an internal moral code - and where does that code come from? It must be through some type of faith and concept of truth. By stressing that we should not advance Christian ideals in our government implies that we have no business influencing how it works or creating laws that reflect our worldview; but apparently pagans do have this right?

As Christians truth is derived through The Scriptures and the Spirit. As it is we must never place the advancement of man's ideals ahead of the truth, for we know man's ideals are corrupted and the world belongs to Satan.

Jesus made it clear that the truth can be known, and that it has an enemy in the Deceiver. Be aware that he is always looking for a way to distract us from the truth, and that is why I believe so many Christians are setting aside abortion and believing that improvement in our lives will come through an enlightened thinker such as Obama. This distracts from the truth, and draws us to man centered thinking.

To consider that you have not decided when life begins tells me you are tantalized by the thinking of the world. It is really not a hard thing to grasp when laid before God's word, and I encourage you to do this.

I suspect I am an old man in comparison to you. I'm 46 years old and the ways of my youth were riddled with worldly thinking (I still fight against it). Yet God graciously dealt with my obstinance, and has lead me to a clearer understanding of how much I want to exalt myself and man.

I hope you realize this was not an argument for why McCain should have won, but a reason why Obama should not have. I think he represents a most dangerous kind of thinking. Yet, as I said I will pray for him and give him the respect the Scriptures cammand me to give him.

Thank you for engaging in this discussion with me. Seek the truth my friend and keep a wary eye out for the ways of the world for it is very alluring.

greenexperiment

November 6, 2008 at 03:05 PM

I, too, am the only African American that I know that voted for LIFE. I don't feel bad about it, even though my family does not know how I can vote against my "own people." I am one of God's people and I felt the need to respect God first.

Timur

November 6, 2008 at 01:28 PM

Anyways, absolutely great discussion Ron. I really wish more people like you would be willing to discuss these important issues by getting out of the shroud of party politics. I do think that if Christians want to influence politics they must take an all or nothing approach and be prepared to live under that system. The great thing that we can all realize is that no matter who screws up the White House, God is still in charge. I am blessed that I can take my comfort in that.

Timur

November 6, 2008 at 01:02 PM

I personally have not made up my mind where life begins. I do however understand that there is a very large group of Americans (mainly non-Christians) that do believe life starts outside of the womb. I think that it is unfair to force others to adopt a Christian belief system that they feel does not apply to them. If someone as a Christian believes life starts at conception, then fine, set an example and don't have an abortion. Legislating our faith into Western politics only cheapens it. And again, how can we advocate to protect lives with one hand and then turn around and carelessly take them away with the other?

Bob

November 5, 2008 at 12:57 PM

I respect the very nuanced sense you displayed of the choice you faced. Thank you for that. However, I've been making the argument (http://abobslifeandtimes.blogspot.com/) that I do not think there is actually any proof that Republicans are more pro-life than Democrats in practice (although they certainly always make a big show of it in rhetoric.) I have grown tired of this worn-out rhetoric that the GOP is the party of life and Democrats are somehow antithetical to life. And I am not even referring to the "consistent ethic of life" theology (abortion, death penalty, poverty, war) - I am talking specifically about abortions. Check my blog for my case as to why I don't believe Republicans can claim the life mantle. In my post, I argue that pro-life folks really did have two choice in this election, even when just looking at the abortion issue. I voted for Obama yesterday, not to join the cool crowd, but because it makes best sense with our Christian and Biblical calls to peace, justice, love, and LIFE.

barrywallace

November 5, 2008 at 12:42 PM

Eric, thank you. You have no idea how much you've encouraged me today. I share your "hope to live long enough to witness another African American become a candidate for President of the United States of America—a candidate who is pro-life and pro-righteousness."

Carl

November 5, 2008 at 12:42 PM

Good post. Not in 100% agreement with it, but overall a good post. Thank you and may God bless.

debt

November 5, 2008 at 12:31 PM

God bless you, brother! Oh how I have appreciated the wise and thoughtful posts at this site in recent days. May the church arise in this hour and be the salt and light she was commanded to be and may we continue, by His grace, to have the open door to share the gospel, for this is what will be bring "true" change. Keep on!!!

Shockwave

November 5, 2008 at 12:31 PM

I read what you are saying and I respect your choice. Even if I don't necessarily agree with your ultimate decision, I wish that more Americans, black, white or otherwise, would think this much when they go to cast that ballot.

I admit on the outset I was only for Obama because we were both of African American blood. But as I got a bit older (if you can say the move from 17 to 18 is that much older) I realized that's too...weak of a quality to earn my vote.

I truly believe Obama will be a President that will guide the United States through this turmoil that we are going through and even if he wasn't your choice for President, I ask that you offer if nothing else your prayers that he does the best job he can.

W. Kyoo

November 5, 2008 at 12:27 PM

teomen,

Great post!

"...it continually fascinates me that we are as concerned with Obama's race as we are with his socialistic tendencies."
"When do we get to stop talking about color, and start talking about hearts?"

Bernt and Erin Eidsmoe

November 5, 2008 at 12:26 PM

Wow! A very convicting and Godly response. Thank you for posting.

—bernt

W. Kyoo

November 5, 2008 at 12:22 PM

I agree with Rev. Eric in many points.
- A hearty "amen" that he sticks with his Biblical convictions rather than personal preferences.
- Agreed that he voted for the unborn rather than his "own ethnic community."
- Love the paragraphs under the section, "My Duty to Christ and the King"

However, I have a few questions:

Why is it that "African Americans" make such a big deal about their race? Why does it matters so much that "Never in the history of the USA has a "BLACK" president been elected into the oval office!" We do not live in the 1960s anymore. It is not like it used to be. If we, as evangelicals are all so passionate about the glory of God and exaltation of Christ, why is this post so concerned with race? An Asian has never been elected into the oval office and yet we are not all "waiting for that historic day in American history."

Rev. Redmond's statement:

"How I wish that the first time there was a probable opportunity for an African American candidate to reach the White House I could have cast my vote for such a candidate without any reservation."

seems to contradict his "attempt to be Christocentric rather than Afrocentric..." When he states "I hope to live long enough to witness another African American become a candidate for President of the United States of America—a candidate who is pro-life and pro-righteousness." Why can we not all hope to live long enough for ANY righteous and pro-life candidate to take the Oval Office? Why does he have to be black?

I love his statement: "neither is the Gospel, for the Gospel calls each of us to stand against an ethnic-centered philosophy of one's own race, for such a philosophy is naturally conformed to this present world and is in need of redemption. If you cannot stand against your own culture where it does not square with the Scriptures, you are the one who is ashamed of Christ, and such shame has nothing to with philosophical or ontological Blackness; it only has to do with your view of the majesty of the God who calls you to deny yourself in order to follow Christ." And he even ends his post with "I think the best way to honor their work and lives when the office of Commander in Chief is within reach would be to continue that moral quest. That quest is continued by finding a candidate who seeks to see African Americans, even those in the womb, treated humanely—as people rather than as cattle for our labor and experimentation or as a 3/5th-human fetus." However, the majority of this post seems to be implying Rev. Redmond's desire to see a African American Commander-in-Chief? Why is this?
Am I reading this post wrong?

Brian Mann

November 5, 2008 at 12:11 PM

This was a wonderful post, thank you for your time and sharing your heart, may this article encourage Christians everywhere. Blessings, Brian.

a_weak_rose

November 5, 2008 at 12:07 PM

Thank you!

Teomen

November 5, 2008 at 11:58 AM

Thank you for your post, it is great to have people from different backgrounds and clearly different perspectives.

I must admit I am curious what the problem with Governor Palin is, she strikes me as holding to Biblical principles more closely than McCain, Obama, or Biden.

Second, it continually fascinates me that we are as concerned with Obama's race as we are with his socialistic tendencies. I think it is far more significant that Obama's is in favor mas mass murder of children, of "spreading the wealth", has been surrounded by extremely questionable men and women, and all this was ignored. I think our countries new direction towards socialism is more significant, than that we have a black president. We do we get to stop talking about color, and start talking about hearts?

Roger a.k.a. RSG

November 5, 2008 at 11:53 AM

Thank you for your honest words. You bring up a very insightful truth: while government may allow certain practices, it's up to the people to decide whether or not to engage in them.

As believers, we often get caught up in our passions and fight the war while forgetting the smaller battles that happen every day. Real change is still possible. Maybe we have suffered a setback in the cause for the unborn on a legislative level, but the little battles remain unchanged.

Our best hope for preventing abortions remains (and always has been) addressing those who go get them. while we don't have the law on our side, we can still talk to the would-be mothers and pray that our ministering to them (not our condemnation) will cause them to turn away from the abortion clinics. We should try to start organizations that can fund research in post-rape/incest counseling that gives an alternative to victims who have gotten pregnant. We should fund more ad campaigns that remind mothers that there are alternatives. We should seek to establish groups that can provide adoptive services for the children and that can provide support to the pregnant mother during pregnancy so she has some incentive to withstand the unwanted pregnancy. while we may not be able to rely on our policy makers, we still have a voice that can (and will) be heard by those who would have abortions. But let us not forget that the voice should always reflect God's love and NOT our self righteousness.

On a final note, sinners will always sin. While we may make it harder for them to commit certain sins, a person who is dead-set on sinning will do so (look no further than our nation's drug problem for an example). while the stakes are higher (i.e. life & death) in the abortion battle, we would be foolish to stop at thinking that changing laws will stop them. The burden to reach out to the mothers that would engage in them is still there and still ours. And regardless of who's in the White House, that's a battle that we still haven't lost.

LCFT

November 5, 2008 at 11:52 PM

Lesser of two evils, some things are not as evil as abortion, are we as beleivers ranking sin as though some evil is more evil than others.

Voting for life means going against the African American community, are you serious, are all Blacks in this country pro-choice.

Conservatives stood aside and allowed the slaughter of slaves and thier families, hangings, beatings and other sinful activities to be performed on blacks in this country, and wonder why now their voice seems to not be heard in reference to abortion.

If abortion is made illegal, people will still need this same gospel that moved Pastor Redmond to vote for Mccain.

I also do not think that christians want to start spiritually nit-picking canidates or parties for if we do nobody will vote.

Pastor Redmond I respect you, but you seem to have overlooked social justice, biblical manhood and womanhood, and the family in your vote.

Peace on it!

surprisedbyjoy

November 5, 2008 at 11:44 PM

"The moral equivocating is repulsive and a slap in the face of truth."

Well, sorry for expressing an opinion, but I find thousands of verses in the Bible which threaten entire civilizations based on their abuse or lack of care for the poor. It's not that abortion isn't important, but we have to remember the way our system works, and ask ourselves what we can do in the meantime. I know a lot of people who will turn up on election day and vote the pro-life ticket, but won't lift a finger to help a single mom who's struggling to get by. I believe the problem of abortion is one that is primarily spiritual and won't be solved with laws. Laws will only endanger the lives of both woman and child because abortion won't go away just because we pass some laws. If we value life, it must be reflected in the way we live out our lives. We must be willing to be the answer to our own prayers.

Paul Thompson

November 5, 2008 at 11:32 AM

This is a timely word with deep and rich insight and care given to each word. Thank you for taking the time to pen your thoughts.

Tripp

November 5, 2008 at 11:24 AM

Wow. Our first black President's first order of business is to make sure that more than the current rate of 1 out of every 2 black babies will die. How ironic and sad at the same time.

I've gone from angry, to sad, and now optimistic about what this administration will hold. I honestly believe there is going to be persecution coming for the church in America for those who oppose homosexual marriage. I'm sure we'll be going the way of Canada and Great Britain with their "hate speech" laws under Obama. And I think the American church needs some persecution, so I rejoice in this! I just know it's not me who will suffer, it's the 4000 babies per day that will face the brunt of the suffering.

Patrick

November 5, 2008 at 11:16 AM

I wish you would have written this post before Election day..

JW

November 5, 2008 at 11:14 AM

Eric,

I have been reading your blog and this blog for just over two years. I have never met you or Justin, but you both have been such a blessing to me. Your article today articulates such a great love for Christ and the realization that we serve only Him. To Him be glory.

Thanks,

Jason

Samantha

November 5, 2008 at 11:12 AM

Wow. You are my hero today. (In a non-Jesus sort of way, of course.) Thank you for this beautiful response. I'm sending a link to your post to everyone I know. I particularly want them to read the part about living for God's glory under Obama.

Thank you, again!

rewilsons

November 5, 2008 at 10:36 AM

Eric-

thank you for the excellent article, you served us well

Tim Crummett

November 5, 2008 at 10:23 AM

Continue on in your good work Eric.

DJP

November 5, 2008 at 10:18 AM

...his poor choice for a running mate....

And there, you lose me.

Amy

November 5, 2008 at 10:12 AM

Rev. Redmond,

Thank you very much for your post! I am grateful for your transparency in sharing your struggles in regards to this election.

Also thank you for your words regarding God's call on our lives: "If you cannot stand against your own culture where it does not square with the Scriptures, you are the one who is ashamed of Christ..." These words are so indicting to me in regard to my own life and as well as much of what I see in the church here in America.

My prayer is that the body of Christ in the U.S. will begin to "deny ourselves, take up our crosses, and follow Him." That we may show our fellow citizens that hope does not lie in who is president or what political party is controlling Congress, but our hope is in the LORD.

May the LORD bless you as He directs your steps!

sojourners

November 5, 2008 at 10:07 AM

incredible response. thank you.

Laura

November 5, 2008 at 10:05 AM

Beautiful. Praise God for you, brother Eric.

Christopher Lake

November 5, 2008 at 09:02 PM

Beowulf,

As you know, I am Reformed in my theological convictions. I firmly believe in God's absolute sovereignty over all things. However, in His sovereignty, God sometimes permits evil things to happen that go against His revealed moral will-- such as abortion. This is hard to understand, but the Bible clearly shows that God *does not* rejoice over evil. Nor do His true followers, including Reformed Christians. God permits evil, in His mysterious plan, but we, as His people, are to fight against evil. That is *also* part of His plan.

As for the souls of deceased babies, Scripture is not crystal-clear on their destination. One thing that is clear, though, is that we are all born "in Adam," with the stain of original sin. If God takes all aborted babies to Heaven, that is His divine right to do so. If He chooses that some go to Heaven and some to Hell, that is also His right. All that He does is holy and righteous. The hard truth is that *no one* is inherently "innocent" before God. We are all born in sin and conceived in iniquity (which has nothing to do with conception being bad though, for anyone who wonders)!

Christopher Lake

November 5, 2008 at 08:47 PM

Brother Eric,

Thank you so much for your beautiful, moving, inspiring words. You have made this day a brighter one for me with your post here. Thank you also for standing firm and voting in line with your pro-life convictions, in the face of possible pressure from others. I will be praying for you and your family as you make decisions about your future, which is in God's very able hands!

Ray Ortlund

November 5, 2008 at 08:42 PM

Thoughtful, courageous, nuanced, instructive, inspiring.

Thank you, brother.

Chris

November 5, 2008 at 08:25 PM

Thank you for this timely reminder that our loyalty is first to Christ over any other. This reminds me of a passage from Richard Wurmbrand's book, TORTURED FOR CHRIST. In the book Wurmbrand talks about how the "language of love and the language of seduction are the same. The one who wishes a girl for a wife and the one who wishes her for only a night both say the words, 'I love you.' Jesus has told us to discern between the language of seduction and the language of love...Unfortunately, when the Communists came to power (in Romania), thousands of priests, pastors, and ministers did not know how to discern between the two voices...four thousand priests, pastors, and ministers of all denominations (in Romania)...chose Joseph Stalin as honorary president (of the congress of all Christian bodies)...at the same time he was president of the World Movement of the Godless and a mass murderer of Christians. One after another, bishops and pastors arose and declared that communism and Christianity are fundamentally the same and could coexist. One minister after another said words of praise toward communism and assured the new government of the loyalty of the Church. My wife ...told me, 'Richard, stand up and wash away this shame from the face of Christ! They are spitting in His face...'Then I arose and spoke to this congress, praising not the murderers of Christians, but Jesus Christ, stating that our loyalty is due first to him...I had to pay for this, but it was worthwhile."
(pages 15-16)

Oh, how we must pray that our new president and the leaders he chooses will not be deceived by the message of seduction. He can do so much to shine the light of freedom in our world if he can resist the message of seduction and embrace the message of love...

urbanresurgence

November 5, 2008 at 07:18 PM

Great thoughts! I too casted my vote based on the truths of Scripture (specifically protection of the innocent and unborn and the definition of marriage) above making racial history.

Let's pray for our President!

d.

Terry T

November 5, 2008 at 06:58 PM

Pastor Redmond,

Powerful, insightful. Would that more of our fellow followers of Christ would apply such thinking to the issues of everyday living. Imagine just how "salty" we would be in the world if we did.

But the scandal of the evangelical church in general and our Southern Baptist Churches particularly is that we are more interested in finding our "Purpose in life" rather than thinking biblically.

ron

November 5, 2008 at 06:51 PM

Some of the comments here are absolutely astonishing to me. The moral equivocating is repulsive and a slap in the face of truth.

Arguing that war or health care equates with abortion is a sign of the growing apathy towards the most innocent in our society. Abortion is murder. Deflecting the conversation does not change the fact that abortion is a horrible indictment on the character of America. This isn't about McCain or Republicans, it's about the lies people are believing. The fact that some are writing comments defending Obama on this issue makes me wonder when God will end this great American experience.

Shamgar

November 5, 2008 at 06:22 PM

beowulf2k8,

Now that Obama will be President, the Arminians can rejoice all day long over the never ending pile of dead babies sent to heaven, never having to worry about the possibility they might not be able to save themselves and end up in hell.

beowulf2k8

November 5, 2008 at 05:40 PM

Now that Obama will be President, the god of Calvinism can finally be satiated with a never ending pile of dead babies to sent to hell for no fault of their own.

Soli gloria Deo. Non autem gloria deo Calvini.

Rachael Starke

November 5, 2008 at 05:19 PM

Eric,

Thank you so much for your helpful and gracious post. In particular,

"...even if one is seeking to be consistent in humility and holiness individually, to abstain from voting on any matter is to allow the majority to speak for you. That same majority, with a victory, might make trouble for the greater populous by means of the evil(s) of which you sought to distance yourself by abstaining from voting."

This point is a sharp rebuke to many.

Also, many points you've stated as regards to the intersection of race and identiy in Christ seem to stand in pretty sharp contrast to Anthony Carter's perspective. As a member of "the paler nation" trying and failing to find ways or places to ask questions and receive answers humbly and biblically about how we can strive to pursue gospel-centered oneness amidst racial diversity, I would find it helpful to read more back and forth discussion between Anthony and yourself about this issue.

Mary Jones

November 5, 2008 at 05:14 PM

I didn't know there was so much peer pressure among African Americans. Thanks for voting your convictions.

Stan McCullars

November 5, 2008 at 05:05 PM

surprisedbyjoy,
Being pro-choice does not make you anti-life...

You're right. Rather than calling pro-choice people "anti-life" we should call them what they are, "supporters of the continued practice of dismembering babies."

Sara in MN

November 5, 2008 at 04:59 PM

Rich
"> President-Elect Obama is the most anti-life senator to come to power in my lifetime

I was directed to your blog entry by a relative. Can you offer citations supporting your claim? After all, there have been many senators who have "come to power" (or as I would say, "been elected") during your lifetime.

Since this observation seems to be at the core of your concern surrounding President-elect Obama, I would like to see the supporting evidence."

Rich - I read it as he was elected to Senator, and NOW president - both are "come into power", not just that a lot of senators have necessarily been elected to President in his lifetime.

Evidence to that statement abounds - here are just a few.

http://www.ontheissues.org/Barack_Obama.htm

http://www.nationaljournal.com/voteratings/sen/lib_cons.htm?o1=lib_composite&o2=desc

http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/viewarticle.php?selectedarticle=2008.10.14_George_Robert_Obama's%20Abortion%20Extremism_.xml

http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2008/jun/08061010.html

surprisedbyjoy

November 5, 2008 at 04:57 PM

Being pro-choice does not make you anti-life any more than accepting the reality of war makes you anti-life. I am sick of every election boiling down to abortion.

"So the economy, the war in Iraq, and universal health insurance became secondary issues for me—albeit very important ones —because righteousness was not at stake."

I think God would disagree with you here. War not only causes death, it encourages and rewards killing. As to health care, any country that would allow 1/6 of its citizens to be routinely denied affordable coverage should be ashamed of itself. America is the only industrialized country in the entire world that doesn't offer some kind of subsidized national health care for everyone!

Abortion is a terrible sin, yes, but it is not one that is mandated. No women have it done except by their own free will.

On a last note, we should all be able to live "Soli Deo Gloria" regardless of who becomes elected President. Our true citizenship, after all, is in heaven.

moses

November 5, 2008 at 04:23 PM

I am Christian, Black and voted for Obama. I never asked another Black person who they were voting for. Who asked you?

You thought you were voting against your culture but it was not the case. If you are a conservative you always vote against your culture. I dont think Black people mind.

katiebkh

November 5, 2008 at 04:23 PM

The Day after Election 2008

I listened to Obama's acceptance speech. I loved what he said about how great this country is and how no where but in America can this kind of thing happen. I loved that democracy worked (though we are suppose to be a republic) and I love that the American dream has shown just how great this country has been. I actually felt for the black people crying. I can understand the feelings of awe that a black man is President of the United States of America. It is incredible and wonderful as far as all that goes. I have always thought it an atrocity the way black people were treated in the past and continue to be treated. I see it as no less of an atrocity than the Holocaust. I am not upset that Obama is black. That has nothing to do with it for me.

But oh, the sadness I feel realizing that the liberal powers that be have won our country over. I will never understand how people can save whales and trees and yet boldly fight for abortion rights. I will never get the fact that people see freedom as being able to do all the evil you want without interference. I fear for all those that will see Obama as a way to do nothing for themselves...making government their god. I am scared for America. I am sad for America. I just ache inside at the thought that our great country has been turned into a godless paradise for evil.

I appreciate your overwhelming love for Christ over earthly heritage! God Bless you for putting Him first!

Barb Henderson
Asheville NC

ktown7

November 5, 2008 at 04:22 PM

Oh, Silvah. You are the breath of air here. If we don't get out of this current two party system, we could very well see the end of the Republic. Christians should be voting with the Constitution Party or finally getting some actual conservatives filling the Republican seats.

ktown7

November 5, 2008 at 04:18 PM

I have to agree with W. Kyoo. As much as I appreciate what I think Mr. Redmond was attempting to say, I found the same contradictions in his thinking. Maybe trying to be reformed has convoluted his ability to think clearly.

But to add, there was this little bit...

"the African American cause for victory"

What does that mean? Apparently, blacks see electing a "black" man as president as some sort of victory. Why? Should I want vindication against Italians because my people were once opressed by the Romans?
And why would they vote for someone who is against everything they say they stand for as Christians?

In the end I don't understand why it's so HARD for you to think independently of your ethnic group? I know you did and I applaud you but I don't know why I should have to applaud you.

Anyway, I hope they got it out of their system and we can go back to caring about principles rather than race. Jessie Jackson was crying and Oprah swooned. Ridiculous

I would without hesitation vote for a black candidate who holds to constitutional conservative principles. I'd vote for a Cherokee, or a Chinaman (is that politically correct? Chinaman?)

That is my new hope and goal wherewith I shall channel all my political energies. A Cherokee in the Oval office!

silvah

November 5, 2008 at 03:23 PM

Interesting article. And I understand and even followed suite with you in not voting for Obama because I value the life of the unborn. As an African American woman I understand what it was like to walk into the voting booth and know your convictions did not allow you to vote Obama. However, my convictions did not allow me to vote for McCain either (and you din't say that you did, but it seemed implied, but you can correct me if I'm wrong). While you label issues of healthcare and the war as not being about rightouesness, though the righteous man is concerned with those issues too, I would disagree there. Also, I don't think McCain is really pro-life so much as he is anti-abortion. And there is a difference, and I think Christian's need to stop being afraid of not voting for either major party candidate.

benjaminpark

November 5, 2008 at 03:10 PM

Wonderfully thought out and gracious post.

I have to admit that I'm disappointed that some of the responses you're receiving, however, are not as gracious. It looks like there are still plenty of people out there who are not willing to open their ears to those who "are on the other side". This, I think, is a serious problem not only for our country, but for Christ's church.

With that said, while I appreciated the dilemma (race vs. faith conviction) you attempted to tackle, the one that I think we need to be talking about as Christians and citizens is what you get at in defending the right to life for those who have no say in the matter. I'm afraid the issue is not as clear cut as pro-life/pro-choice. We still have a huge debate out regarding when life begins (conception? after a certain number of months? are Christians okay with the use of contraceptives?), not to mention some lack of clarity over the best road towards achieving these goals (for example: depending on how you define things, you could find yourself having to defend the cause of those who perform terrorist acts against doctors and nurses).

I guess all I'm saying is this issue is more complicated than a 30 second (or minute!) campaign ad can deal with...but the atmosphere surrounding it is such that such a discussion seems nearly impossible.

Back to your original post, however: thank you for putting your struggle out there and opening up this discussion!

Rich

November 5, 2008 at 03:08 PM

> President-Elect Obama is the most anti-life senator to come to power in my lifetime

I was directed to your blog entry by a relative. Can you offer citations supporting your claim? After all, there have been many senators who have "come to power" (or as I would say, "been elected") during your lifetime.

Since this observation seems to be at the core of your concern surrounding President-elect Obama, I would like to see the supporting evidence.

suubi

November 5, 2008 at 02:55 PM

Eric,

Thank you for your words. As the white parent of two young Ugandan children, I thank you for your transparency and your distinctionof being Christocentric rather than Afrocentric first and foremost. I praise you for your courage and hope to be able to impart those lessons you learned in this election to my children as they grow older.

On a personal note, I also appreciate your encouragement and assurance that we can pray for, respect, be subject to, and honor our new leader when that day comes.

Thank you,

Tim

michael

November 5, 2008 at 02:48 PM

Eric,

God's glory shines in your passion to please and Glorify Christ, rather than men! What an inspiration to us all. All of WBC/CBS should all be proud!

scottfamblog

November 5, 2008 at 02:20 PM

Thank you for this...it explains some of the fear I feel in my heart this morning. Thank you for choosing life...I also chose life!

Shamgar

November 5, 2008 at 02:14 PM

The truth is that the Republican party will no more increase the cause of abortion as decrease it. So if voting between two would you not choose the lesser of two evils. Which is what Redmond, more or less said

That is not the truth, you just aren't paying attention. Most Christians have already moved on to the equally pragmatic (and equally wrong)"at least they'll allow murdering fewer babies" argument.

The bottom line is that every one of those lives is infinitely valuable because it is made in the image of God. When they are murdered, it is not a matter of quantitative differences.

The question is not what is pragmatic, or what is expedient if you truly believe that God is sovereign over nations and kings. The question is what is right. The issue is whether or not you will choose to participate in evil. If you voted for either one of the major party candidates, that's the choice you made, and that is the choice you have to answer for.

The question is not what seems wise and best to us, but what is right in the eyes of God.

Shamgar

November 5, 2008 at 02:08 PM

You know, the more I think about it, the more this article kind of annoys me. I could just be reading too much into this article, but it strikes me as if you are trying to evoke some sympathy from your readers...and for what? For doing the right thing, even when it's hard?

Well, you won't get it from me. So you've got friends and acquaintances that put pressure on you to be a racist (in this case voting to support someone because of the color of their skin) hey, guess what, you're not the first. Won't be the last.

You "did not want to be against the side of history—of an African American finally making it to the Oval Office." -- that doesn't even make sense to me. Someone is always against the side of history. Everyone who voted for Dole was against the side of history. So was everyone who voted for Al Gore, by this definition. Or maybe you mean momentous history, because somehow "finally" electing a black man president bestows some magical milestone on this nation.

What exactly has changed? The only way the color of his skin matters here is if that's why people supported him. And if that's why then things haven't gotten better at all! How is it historic if he was just the most recent beneficiary of affirmative action and white guilt?

If he was elected because people believed his message and support his policies, how is that historic? In theory that's what happens in every election.

If he got it because people are sick and tired of the Republicans and their constant bait-and-switch campaigning, out-of-control spending, the war, etc, and desperately wanted change, any change and the lack of any decent leadership at the top of the republican ticket resulted in strong republican apathy then how does that become a significant historic event?

All of this "woe is me, I'm a conservative black man and I took a stand and now liberals don't like me" is really tiring. Guess what, I'm a conservative and I take regular stands, and I get hated by the currently predominate "neoconservative" wing of my own party AND liberals.

It's life. Time to cowboy up brother. You do the right thing and you keep going, you don't whine about it on blogs. Instead, we say "We are unworthy slaves; we have done only that which we ought to have done."

(Especially when your response was not to do the right thing, but rather to side with a different majority, even though doing so meant supporting someone who likewise is not pro-life by any meaningful definition of the term, and who in every other way, by your own admission, was utterly unqualified for the job for which you were recommending him.)

xfirefly18x

November 5, 2008 at 01:57 PM

Hmm, well, I am very happy that you have chosen to vote against baby killer Obama (he voted to allow a born alive baby, from a botched abortion attempt, to be left alone on a table until it dies), however, it dismays me to think that any non-white person would even consider this man as a viable option, for 2 seconds!

A few years ago, when fully black (both his parents were of African descent) Alan Keyes, a wonderfully moral and eloquent man, ran for president, I did not see the non-white folks come out in force in his support! WHY ?!?!

The Uncle Tom term is also deeply disturbing. If any person invoking the name of that great character has read the book "Uncle Tom's cabin" they would know that this man was the most amazing "Christ character" ever written about! Uncle Tom is a man I would aspire to be like if I were a black man. He helped many of his own, and was NOT a supporter of the slave owners. He was fair-minded and considered whites who HELPED him and others as his friends. He was not prejudiced against them.

And finally, I just have to say that the largest enemy of the black community is coming from within. The Irish, and the Jews were treated just as terribly and they fought to pull themselves out by NOT wallowing in self-pity and finger pointing, but rather teaching their children to work hard!

My close friends that are black have told me that their own families condemn them for having darker skin and for consorting with white folks. WHY? Some of us white folks were also descendants of slaves, not slave owners. Many of us white folks were descendants of people who ran the underground railroad and actually helped slaves escape. Yet, all white folks are treated as if they are slave owning racists. Do they not remember that the first people to sell Africans into slavery were other black Africans!?!?

Sorry for the tirade - I just get so frustrated.

If we are Christians then we must follow Christ - just as Eric has said - not be Afro-centric, or America-centric, or capitalist - but choose to know NOTHING except Christ and Him crucified!

Stan McCullars

November 5, 2008 at 01:45 PM

Bob,
I argue that pro-life folks really did have two choice in this election, even when just looking at the abortion issue.

Ever hear of the Freedom of Choice Act?

You're delusional.

sbynyc

November 5, 2008 at 01:44 PM

Sir: You could have done what I did (and have done in the last 2 out 3 Presidential Elections) and voted for Alan Keyes, who was a certified write in candidate in Maryland. He is African-American (FYI, I am not) and he is solidly pro-life. You would then have had absolutely no discernible dilemma and your conscious would have been more than satisfied. Perhaps next time. God Bless You.

Lawson

November 5, 2008 at 01:22 PM

Bob...

Eric C. Redmond did not proclaim the GOP party as the saviors of the unborn. The truth is that the Republican party will no more increase the cause of abortion as decrease it. So if voting between two would you not choose the lesser of two evils. Which is what Redmond, more or less said

Mberenis

November 22, 2008 at 01:04 AM

Obama has already made lending for middle and lower class citizens before he's in the white house! Amazing, read more below..

New Types of Low Interest Loans & Grants from Obama

brn13july

November 17, 2008 at 06:34 PM

Why do you talk as though there were only 2 people contesting for the White House? There were 6 other candidates and why didn't all you pro-life, Bible-loving, Soli-Deo-Gloria-living, forgetting-that-you-belong-to-a different-world Christians vote for the other candidates who were pro-life and pro-marriage? Is it ignorance or are you all also so blinded by the media? I would like to ask Eric, why did he vote for McCain when he could have voted Chuck Baldwin or Bob Barr or someone else and how can that be 'godly wisdom' when he did not consider the rest of the candidates?

Arlene Norton

November 11, 2008 at 03:17 PM

Let's look at a few facts here - Roe V Wade was passed back during the Nixon (Republican) administration and was approved by a Republican appointed majority Supreme Court at the time. Further more Bush in his eight years was able to send soldiers to an unjust war based on lies, hold prisoners without question, justify torture, and run up an 11 trillion dollar defict - yet the two times that abortion reversal was brought to his attention in congress - Bush went silent. John McCain, who hasn't been to church in 50 +years, became a Southern Baptist months before the election and he refused to be baptized in his newly found Arizona church. He was pro-choice and pro-stem cell way back in 2007. He just this year has stated that he was pro-life now and would not reverse Roe V Wade, but put it back into the hands of the states to decide, like capital punishment - so tell me how he (McCain) is any different from Obama? Tell me in what way Republicans have done anything since the 70's to overturn Roe V Wade? Tell me how Republicans have done anything other than use the religious right as a base for votes to get elected, then abandon them after in positions of power? The silence speaks volumes. I believe in God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit, not the Republican Party. Sorry, I just can't buy this party of bait and switch anymore. People can twist their minds into a pretzel to justify just about anything they do these days - but Jesus didn't care too much for politics and I think we shouldn't care to much about it either. God is in control, not John McCain, Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi, or Carl Rove.